Mosquito Curtains Blog

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3 Raw Netting Use and Installation Tips

Many creative solutions can be made from mesh netting.Whether your project is to cover a baby’s crib from biting insects, keep leaves and hawks out of a koi pond, or to create an outdoor projection screen, mesh netting might be your answer.  

With a few simple fasteners you can rig your netting for just about any purpose.  Here are some tips to choose the netting mesh that is right for you.

Purchase High Quality Netting

High quality mesh netting, though they may be twice the price as cheaper netting, will last ten times longer and save you significant time and expenses in the long run.

Indoor Mesh

Plan to use indoor and outdoor netting appropriately. For example, mosquito netting from a fabric store is typically for clothing or indoor use and easily wears out when employed outdoors.  

Outdoor Mesh

For outdoor use, make sure you purchase 100% polyester or polypropylene; cotton and nylon will rot outdoors in no time.  The good news is that there are online vendors that sell marine-grade quality netting in various sizes, including jumbo-sized rolls with single sheets up to 12 ft. wide, cut to any desired length.  If larger sheets are required, some online vendors will seam panels together to create virtually any size.

Color Considerations

If ordering black netting, be sure it is solution-dyed, which colors the threads to their core.  Solution dying is rare in mesh netting.  The more common surfaced-dyed fabrics will fade in no time.  Solution-dying white mesh netting is far less important, as fading is not an issue.

Stitching netting for durability

Stitching Considerations

Additionally, make sure the loom is lock-stitched. Lock-stitch is a type of stitch that securely fastens two different threads such that it will not unravel when cut (in mosquito netting, a row thread and a column thread). Lock-stitching can be easily observed upon inspection: massage the material vigorously; if the holes noticeably shift, then it is probably not set in a lock-stitch. Rather, it is likely that heat was stamped into a grid, causing the netting to unravel.

Thread Weight

Lastly, check the thread weight.  Thread weight is measured in a unit called denier. Netting will range from 60 denier on the flimsy end to the studier 400+ denier.  The easiest way to check the sturdiness of the threads is by poking your thumb through it – if your thumb goes through, it’s not sturdy enough and you can count on the fabric fading by the end of the year.

Not all netting is marine-grade: a great example of cheap mesh material is the netting mesh curtains on aluminum gazebos sold in home improvement stores.  They look nice on a showroom floor, but when placed outside in the wind and other elements, there is no guarantee for how they will hold up.

Use the Right Kind of Mesh Netting

Mosquito Netting

This type of netting is most commonly used since it has the best air flow.  Holes are either square or rectangular at 30-150 holes per square inch.  While not as dense as the other fabrics, marine-grade mosquito netting can be strong enough to lift a person off the ground.

Black netting still has good visibility

No-see-um Netting

No-see-um Netting can be very aesthetically pleasing, and is aesthetically reminiscent of very high quality sheer or stiff materials.  Its name comes from its ability to block a very tiny biting midge fly that live near lakes and coastal areas, commonly called no-see-ums.

To block these tiny flies, the holes are nearly invisible. Because of the density of the netting, it acts much like a screen wall. Thus, black netting can have excellent one-way visibility, depending upon lighting.  When the light is stronger on the opposite side of no-see-um netting, the visuals are very clear.  When light is stronger on the inside of the curtain, the visibility through the material is far less clear.  

White curtains are at best milky to see through and very opaque in direct light.  Supple no-see-um netting stows very tightly and is the first choice of sailors and campers.  White no-see-um netting also makes for an elegant crib net and can even be used as a theater scrim.

Shade mesh

Most shade materials, including mesh, are stiff and block 90-95% of sunlight.  Black Shade mesh is unique in that it is fairly transparent.  Many people find that 80% light block seems to be the right mix to accommodate both outward visibility and sun relief.  For the same reason, pull-down child shades typically use a black mesh with 80% block.  Shade mesh weights more than mosquito and no-see-um nettings, and is about double the weight of a good bed sheet.

APPLICATIONRECOMMENDED MESH
Insect ProtectionMosquito Netting or No-see-um netting
Birds and BatsBlack Mosquito Netting
CampingNo-see-um Netting
Koi Ponds (prevent hawks and leaves)Black Mosquito Netting
Shade, Privacy, Wind, and RainBlack Shade Mesh
Strollers and CribsWhite No-see-um Netting
Gardening and FarmingBlack Mosquito Netting
PollenBlack No-see-um Netting
Sniper Hides and Urban CamouflageBlack No-see-um Netting
Outdoor Projection ScreensWhite Shade Mesh
FiltrationDepends on required hole count

How to Secure Your Netting

For Those Who Sew

If precision is a requirement of the area in which you choose to install the material, sewing mesh fabric, like mosquito netting, can sometimes be a challenge because of its elasticity.

A doubled-over perimeter webbing will reinforce the edges and provide a more robust material for Velcro or other fasteners.  Unfortunately, the sewing process can consume a significant amount of time and thread as you go.  If precision matters, sew a webbing first, and then make your cut for a more accurate result.

Rigging Netting Without Sewing

A perimeter webbing is the best surface for fasteners, but there are other rigging techniques to rig raw mosquito netting fabric.  Some of the ideas below won’t necessarily win a beauty contest, but if functionality is more important than aesthetics to you, these strategies may be a good place to start.  When improvising fastening, aim to think in terms of pulling, pinching or sticking to a surface.

Use Duct Tape

While this may sound crazy, the result is much better than your intuition might tell you.  Duct tape or Gorilla tape comes in an assortment of colors, including black and white.

To implement a duct tape fastening, fold the tape in half over the edge of your mosquito netting.  The adhesive will adhere to itself though the mosquito netting holes.  If using no-see-um netting or shade mesh, you might need to supplement the adhesive with fabric glue.  Gaffer’s tape, used in the movie industry, has a flat finish that looks more cloth-like as opposed to duct tape’s glossy backing.  

Adhesive-backed Velcro will stick very well to the backing of duct tape or gaffer’s tape.  We recommend applying the loop side of Velcro to the panels and use the hook side of the Velcro to adhere to the surface you want to mount to for two reasons.  First, hooked Velcro is easier to brush clean from a surface.  Second, the hook Velcro on the panel will want to catch on the mesh mosquito netting.

Marine snaps are a good option

Marine Snaps

Marine snaps can be placed in raw netting. However, if you want it to last, it is a good idea to place marine snaps through two rubber washers on both sides of the mosquito netting. This way, they won’t rip out over time.

Fabric Clips

Fabric clips will also work, but they could potentially simply rip out of the mesh mosquito netting. Use at your own risk.

Boy Scout Trick

There is a “boy scout trick” to pull on netting without stressing it to rip out.  Drape the netting over any round object, like a marble, round stone, or even a golf ball.  Tie a slip knot over the draped netting. You’ll be able to pull on the netting until the cows come home without ripping the netting.

Rare Earth Magnets

Rare Earth Magnets are incredibly strong and will also provide a secure seal. Glue one magnet to the mounting surface and the other to the netting. Then, simply pinch the mosquito netting between two magnets.

Be Creative!

If all else fails, feel free to get creative! You might need additional support in fastening the netting: I can’t fasten A to B, but I may be able to fasten A to X and then fasten X to B.  A simple example might be to pinch the edge of mosquito netting between two wood slats.  Once complete, you only need to fasten the wood slats to your surface.

Many creative solutions can be made from mesh netting.Whether your project is to cover a baby’s crib from biting insects, keep leaves and hawks out of a koi pond, or to create an outdoor projection screen, mesh netting might be your answer.  

With a few simple fasteners you can rig your netting for just about any purpose.  Here are some tips to choose the netting mesh that is right for you.

Purchase High Quality Netting

High quality mesh netting, though they may be twice the price as cheaper netting, will last ten times longer and save you significant time and expenses in the long run.

Indoor Mesh

Plan to use indoor and outdoor netting appropriately. For example, mosquito netting from a fabric store is typically for clothing or indoor use and easily wears out when employed outdoors.  

Outdoor Mesh

For outdoor use, make sure you purchase 100% polyester or polypropylene; cotton and nylon will rot outdoors in no time.  The good news is that there are online vendors that sell marine-grade quality netting in various sizes, including jumbo-sized rolls with single sheets up to 12 ft. wide, cut to any desired length.  If larger sheets are required, some online vendors will seam panels together to create virtually any size.

Color Considerations

If ordering black netting, be sure it is solution-dyed, which colors the threads to their core.  Solution dying is rare in mesh netting.  The more common surfaced-dyed fabrics will fade in no time.  Solution-dying white mesh netting is far less important, as fading is not an issue.

Stitching netting for durability

Stitching Considerations

Additionally, make sure the loom is lock-stitched. Lock-stitch is a type of stitch that securely fastens two different threads such that it will not unravel when cut (in mosquito netting, a row thread and a column thread). Lock-stitching can be easily observed upon inspection: massage the material vigorously; if the holes noticeably shift, then it is probably not set in a lock-stitch. Rather, it is likely that heat was stamped into a grid, causing the netting to unravel.

Thread Weight

Lastly, check the thread weight.  Thread weight is measured in a unit called denier. Netting will range from 60 denier on the flimsy end to the studier 400+ denier.  The easiest way to check the sturdiness of the threads is by poking your thumb through it – if your thumb goes through, it’s not sturdy enough and you can count on the fabric fading by the end of the year.

Not all netting is marine-grade: a great example of cheap mesh material is the netting mesh curtains on aluminum gazebos sold in home improvement stores.  They look nice on a showroom floor, but when placed outside in the wind and other elements, there is no guarantee for how they will hold up.

Use the Right Kind of Mesh Netting

Mosquito Netting

This type of netting is most commonly used since it has the best air flow.  Holes are either square or rectangular at 30-150 holes per square inch.  While not as dense as the other fabrics, marine-grade mosquito netting can be strong enough to lift a person off the ground.

Black netting still has good visibility

No-see-um Netting

No-see-um Netting can be very aesthetically pleasing, and is aesthetically reminiscent of very high quality sheer or stiff materials.  Its name comes from its ability to block a very tiny biting midge fly that live near lakes and coastal areas, commonly called no-see-ums.

To block these tiny flies, the holes are nearly invisible. Because of the density of the netting, it acts much like a screen wall. Thus, black netting can have excellent one-way visibility, depending upon lighting.  When the light is stronger on the opposite side of no-see-um netting, the visuals are very clear.  When light is stronger on the inside of the curtain, the visibility through the material is far less clear.  

White curtains are at best milky to see through and very opaque in direct light.  Supple no-see-um netting stows very tightly and is the first choice of sailors and campers.  White no-see-um netting also makes for an elegant crib net and can even be used as a theater scrim.

Shade mesh

Most shade materials, including mesh, are stiff and block 90-95% of sunlight.  Black Shade mesh is unique in that it is fairly transparent.  Many people find that 80% light block seems to be the right mix to accommodate both outward visibility and sun relief.  For the same reason, pull-down child shades typically use a black mesh with 80% block.  Shade mesh weights more than mosquito and no-see-um nettings, and is about double the weight of a good bed sheet.

APPLICATIONRECOMMENDED MESH
Insect ProtectionMosquito Netting or No-see-um netting
Birds and BatsBlack Mosquito Netting
CampingNo-see-um Netting
Koi Ponds (prevent hawks and leaves)Black Mosquito Netting
Shade, Privacy, Wind, and RainBlack Shade Mesh
Strollers and CribsWhite No-see-um Netting
Gardening and FarmingBlack Mosquito Netting
PollenBlack No-see-um Netting
Sniper Hides and Urban CamouflageBlack No-see-um Netting
Outdoor Projection ScreensWhite Shade Mesh
FiltrationDepends on required hole count

How to Secure Your Netting

For Those Who Sew

If precision is a requirement of the area in which you choose to install the material, sewing mesh fabric, like mosquito netting, can sometimes be a challenge because of its elasticity.

A doubled-over perimeter webbing will reinforce the edges and provide a more robust material for Velcro or other fasteners.  Unfortunately, the sewing process can consume a significant amount of time and thread as you go.  If precision matters, sew a webbing first, and then make your cut for a more accurate result.

Rigging Netting Without Sewing

A perimeter webbing is the best surface for fasteners, but there are other rigging techniques to rig raw mosquito netting fabric.  Some of the ideas below won’t necessarily win a beauty contest, but if functionality is more important than aesthetics to you, these strategies may be a good place to start.  When improvising fastening, aim to think in terms of pulling, pinching or sticking to a surface.

Use Duct Tape

While this may sound crazy, the result is much better than your intuition might tell you.  Duct tape or Gorilla tape comes in an assortment of colors, including black and white.

To implement a duct tape fastening, fold the tape in half over the edge of your mosquito netting.  The adhesive will adhere to itself though the mosquito netting holes.  If using no-see-um netting or shade mesh, you might need to supplement the adhesive with fabric glue.  Gaffer’s tape, used in the movie industry, has a flat finish that looks more cloth-like as opposed to duct tape’s glossy backing.  

Adhesive-backed Velcro will stick very well to the backing of duct tape or gaffer’s tape.  We recommend applying the loop side of Velcro to the panels and use the hook side of the Velcro to adhere to the surface you want to mount to for two reasons.  First, hooked Velcro is easier to brush clean from a surface.  Second, the hook Velcro on the panel will want to catch on the mesh mosquito netting.

Marine snaps are a good option

Marine Snaps

Marine snaps can be placed in raw netting. However, if you want it to last, it is a good idea to place marine snaps through two rubber washers on both sides of the mosquito netting. This way, they won’t rip out over time.

Fabric Clips

Fabric clips will also work, but they could potentially simply rip out of the mesh mosquito netting. Use at your own risk.

Boy Scout Trick

There is a “boy scout trick” to pull on netting without stressing it to rip out.  Drape the netting over any round object, like a marble, round stone, or even a golf ball.  Tie a slip knot over the draped netting. You’ll be able to pull on the netting until the cows come home without ripping the netting.

Rare Earth Magnets

Rare Earth Magnets are incredibly strong and will also provide a secure seal. Glue one magnet to the mounting surface and the other to the netting. Then, simply pinch the mosquito netting between two magnets.

Be Creative!

If all else fails, feel free to get creative! You might need additional support in fastening the netting: I can’t fasten A to B, but I may be able to fasten A to X and then fasten X to B.  A simple example might be to pinch the edge of mosquito netting between two wood slats.  Once complete, you only need to fasten the wood slats to your surface.




6 Ways to Keep Mosquitoes Away This Summer

Imagine you just spent a lot of time and effort planning an outdoor event.  At the last minute, it occurs to you that you hadn’t thought about the mosquitoes who will be hunting you and your guests.  You panic for a moment, but a brief Internet search reveals there are some things that you can still do to resolve the issue. Be careful, though! Common solutions may not be quite as effective as you might think.

Here are five of the most popular options, and some considerations regarding their effectiveness and use. Overview:

  1. Citronella Candles
  2. DEET
  3. Propane Mosquito Traps
  4. Electric fans
  5. Mosquito Curtains
  6. Chemical Treatment

1. Citronella Candles

Candles add an element of elegance to your event; citronella lends a wonderful scent to the surrounding atmosphere. Put together, though, citronella candles do little to ward off bugs. While the oil of citronella does repel mosquitoes to some degree, “in the amount and concentration that is put out via candles, it’s not very effective,” says Joseph Conlon, a technical adviser for the American Mosquito Control Association. “As a matter of fact, it’s really not significantly more effective than any other candle would be.”

2. DEET

Experts agree that the most effective repellent is still DEET, available in lotions and sprays for topical application.  A can of repellent containing 20-30% DEET at each table will give your guests the chance to escape annoying mosquito bites. Check out the EPA guidelines on using DEET safely.

Image from www.thesportsmanguide.com

3. Propane Mosquito Traps

Traps are not advisable for an event full of people, as they are intended to attract mosquitoes before killing them. If you happen to own a trap, DON’T place the device anywhere near your guests. Place your trap downwind and hope to curtail half the mosquito population in your vicinity.

4. Electric Fans

Mosquitoes are terrible at flying and tend to avoid feeding in wind speeds as low as 8 mph.  They are physically unable to fly in wind speeds above 15.6 mph.  Strategic placement of electric fans as a wind barrier can be very effective for keeping mosquitoes away.  Additionally, electric fans can be relatively inexpensive and repurposed for other uses after the event.

5. Mosquito Curtains

Mosquito Netting curtains create a very effective physical barrier to keep mosquitoes out.  In addition, they add a touch of elegance to your event that will impress your guests.  Solutions range from inexpensively rigging raw netting for the event or a custom, fabricated solution that will protect your space for 4 to 8 years. While purchasing and installing curtains may be slightly more expensive than the other solutions listed here, doing so will have a longer-lasting, more permanent impact on your enjoyment of the outdoors in that space.

6. Chemical Treatment

Chemical treatments are very effective temporary solution and cost about half as much as mosquito netting curtains. The treatment, completed by your local exterminator, lasts about 60 days. Be sure to research the pesticides used prior to calling your exterminator to ensure there is minimal impact to your guests and surrounding environment.

Imagine you just spent a lot of time and effort planning an outdoor event.  At the last minute, it occurs to you that you hadn’t thought about the mosquitoes who will be hunting you and your guests.  You panic for a moment, but a brief Internet search reveals there are some things that you can still do to resolve the issue. Be careful, though! Common solutions may not be quite as effective as you might think.

Here are five of the most popular options, and some considerations regarding their effectiveness and use. Overview:

  1. Citronella Candles
  2. DEET
  3. Propane Mosquito Traps
  4. Electric fans
  5. Mosquito Curtains
  6. Chemical Treatment

1. Citronella Candles

Candles add an element of elegance to your event; citronella lends a wonderful scent to the surrounding atmosphere. Put together, though, citronella candles do little to ward off bugs. While the oil of citronella does repel mosquitoes to some degree, “in the amount and concentration that is put out via candles, it’s not very effective,” says Joseph Conlon, a technical adviser for the American Mosquito Control Association. “As a matter of fact, it’s really not significantly more effective than any other candle would be.”

2. DEET

Experts agree that the most effective repellent is still DEET, available in lotions and sprays for topical application.  A can of repellent containing 20-30% DEET at each table will give your guests the chance to escape annoying mosquito bites. Check out the EPA guidelines on using DEET safely.

Image from www.thesportsmanguide.com

3. Propane Mosquito Traps

Traps are not advisable for an event full of people, as they are intended to attract mosquitoes before killing them. If you happen to own a trap, DON’T place the device anywhere near your guests. Place your trap downwind and hope to curtail half the mosquito population in your vicinity.

4. Electric Fans

Mosquitoes are terrible at flying and tend to avoid feeding in wind speeds as low as 8 mph.  They are physically unable to fly in wind speeds above 15.6 mph.  Strategic placement of electric fans as a wind barrier can be very effective for keeping mosquitoes away.  Additionally, electric fans can be relatively inexpensive and repurposed for other uses after the event.

5. Mosquito Curtains

Mosquito Netting curtains create a very effective physical barrier to keep mosquitoes out.  In addition, they add a touch of elegance to your event that will impress your guests.  Solutions range from inexpensively rigging raw netting for the event or a custom, fabricated solution that will protect your space for 4 to 8 years. While purchasing and installing curtains may be slightly more expensive than the other solutions listed here, doing so will have a longer-lasting, more permanent impact on your enjoyment of the outdoors in that space.

6. Chemical Treatment

Chemical treatments are very effective temporary solution and cost about half as much as mosquito netting curtains. The treatment, completed by your local exterminator, lasts about 60 days. Be sure to research the pesticides used prior to calling your exterminator to ensure there is minimal impact to your guests and surrounding environment.




Top 4 Ways to Enjoy Your Outdoor Space—Without Mosquitoes

Your porch or patio is an excellent way to expand your usable living space and improve the value of your home, but enjoying that porch or patio is hard to do when mosquitoes are crashing the party.

If you find yourself battling mosquitoes on your front porch, you’re not alone. Christopher Ingraham researched and posted the following chart, based on Google searches related to mosquitoes.

Interestingly, if you live in a coastal or Southern region, you’ll likely be fending off mosquitoes and bugs for 4-6 months; if you live in the midwest states, chances are you’ll be fighting mosquitoes for at least 2-3 months; and if you live in a dry region, you’ll have a burst of activity for just 1-2 months. (Generally, mosquito season starts when the temperature reaches above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.)

No matter where you live, mosquitoes can make it hard at times to enjoy the outdoors while reading a good book, playing your guitar, or enjoying a meal with friends.

Top 4 Ways to Enjoy Your Outdoor Space 

After 15 years in the mosquito prevention business, we’ve seen some really good and some really bad products. Here’s an analysis of some of the most popular ways to screen in an outdoor space.

 

Source: Patioenclusures.com

1) Traditional Framed Screen Porches

Overview:

Traditional framed screen porches have become a popular solution for screening in a porch. This type of screening generally involves 4×6 ft framed sections throughout your porch.

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $4,500 – 5,500
  • Effectiveness*: 99.9% protection
  • Time to Install: 40 hours (professional installation)
  • Lifespan: 10 yrs

Pros:

  • They Look Nice: Traditional framed screen porches generally have a nice aesthetic, and work well for common porch structures.
  • Great Seal: These applications do a good job permanently sealing off your porch from the bugs. Other than the screen door occasionally swinging open, you should be sealed off.
  • Long-lasting: Most applications last between 10 and 15 years.

Cons:

  • Permanent: This solution is permanent. So on days when the bugs aren’t out and you want to pull back the screen, you won’t be able to.
  • Snow Damage: If you live in colder climates, you’ll want to keep a close eye on snow build up during the winter. Too much snow leaning against the frame can cause a break.
  • Installation Time: Installation is typically done by a professional installer, and takes about a full week of work (one person) to install.  
  • Detailed Architecture: If your porch has ornate lathed or tapered columns, you’ll end up framing around them, which may detract from the look of your porch.

Expert Voice:

If you live in areas like FL or HI where biting insects are a permanent problem, it makes sense to seek a permanent solution, but if you live in cooler climates where bug season is short, it may make sense to explore some of the other removable options before investing in permanent screening.

Buy From www.patioenclosures.com

 

Source: mosquitocurtains.com

2) Custom Mesh Curtains

Overview:

This product is relatively new to the market and operates similar to window curtains in your home. Rather than retract up and down like motorized screens, these curtains will retract from side to side and can be pulled back into decorative swags.  

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $850
  • Effectiveness*: 99% protection
  • Time to Install: 5 hours (easy DIY installation)
  • Lifespan: 6 yrs

Pros:

  • Cost-effective: The quality and durability are great for the price, and overall this solution is much less expensive than framed or motorized options.  
  • Non-invasive: Since this option hangs from an elegant tracking system, the installation process won’t interfere with the architecture or columns of the structure.
  • Easy DIY: Installation for these custom curtains typically takes about an afternoon and requires only a few common tools.
  • Flexibility: Because these curtains aren’t framed into the porch, they are easy to pull back or remove. For those not quite ready to commit to a permanent system, mosquito curtains might be a good first step.

Cons:

  • Non-permanent: If you are looking for a permanent screen-in solution, than mosquito curtains aren’t for you.
  • Manual: Mosquito curtains are a manual system that you’ll have to retract yourself.

Expert Voice:

Make sure your provider offers robust stainless steel fasteners as these are a frameless system.  Some low-quality systems use refrigerator magnets for doorway seal that are NOT effective under breezy conditions.  The best systems will use rare earth magnets and rod stiffeners for a far better hold.  Mesh made of a more traditional fabric and quality can vary substantially.  While these systems are the least expensive way to screen a porch, be careful to examine quality.

Buy From mosquitocurtains.com

 

Source: http://www.phantomscreens.com/

3) Motorized Screens

Overview:

The motorized screen option is great for those with a larger budget who don’t want to worry about installation or maintenance. This solution is sure to impress your friends, and could be thought of as the Rolls Royce of porch screening.

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $10,000 – 20,000
  • Effectiveness*: 99.5% protection
  • Time to Install: 40 hours (professional installation)
  • Lifespan: 15 yrs

Pros:

  • Turn Key Service: Most reputable motorized screen companies offer full-service installation. All you’ll have to do is tell them where you want the screens and they’ll do the rest.
  • Flexibility: Motorized screens go up and down at the push of a button. Some even have wind sensors that will automatically retract screens in potentially damaging winds.
  • Long lasting: Most motorized applications last between 15 and 20 years.

Cons:

  • Cost: This is the most expensive screen-in solution on the market. You’ll get what you pay for in value, longevity, and ease of use.
  • DIY Option: If you try to install this option independently, things can go wrong quickly. The system runs on vertical tracks that must be precisely measured and carefully installed.

Expert Voice:

Installation is tricky and if you make a mistake either in precise measurements or installation, it’s on you.  Motorized screens are the premier option of Porch Screening for those who are not budgeted, and are a great way to impress your family and friends.  Most will offer a shade option as well.  

Buy from phantomscreens.com

 

Source: improvementscatalog.com

4) One-Size-Fits-All Curtains

Overview:

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $200
  • Effectiveness: 25% protection
  • Time to Install: 2 hours (easy DIY installation)
  • Lifespan: 2 yrs

Pros:

  • Simple DIY: Since this is a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution, the installation is generally very simple.
  • Affordable: This is generally your cheapest option up front.
  • Non-invasive: Similar to the custom curtain solution, the one-size-fits-all solutions are generally very non-invasive—only requiring a few screws and magnets.

Cons:

  • Poor Quality: One-size-fits-all solutions tend to rip easily, and often only last a season or two.
  • Poor Effectiveness: One of the biggest drawbacks to many of these solutions is that they leave open seams and fly open easily in the wind, allowing bugs to pass through.
  • One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Since every porch is different, it is likely that a one-size fits all solution will not work for every part of your porch. These solutions work better for doorways.

Expert Voice:

Be very careful to examine the quality of the screen material and fastening options. Some products offer cheap screw-in options, and kitchen refrigerator-quality magnets. These systems will easily tear and fall apart quickly in breezy conditions.

Buy From improvementscatalog.com

Your porch or patio is an excellent way to expand your usable living space and improve the value of your home, but enjoying that porch or patio is hard to do when mosquitoes are crashing the party.

If you find yourself battling mosquitoes on your front porch, you’re not alone. Christopher Ingraham researched and posted the following chart, based on Google searches related to mosquitoes.

Interestingly, if you live in a coastal or Southern region, you’ll likely be fending off mosquitoes and bugs for 4-6 months; if you live in the midwest states, chances are you’ll be fighting mosquitoes for at least 2-3 months; and if you live in a dry region, you’ll have a burst of activity for just 1-2 months. (Generally, mosquito season starts when the temperature reaches above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.)

No matter where you live, mosquitoes can make it hard at times to enjoy the outdoors while reading a good book, playing your guitar, or enjoying a meal with friends.

Top 4 Ways to Enjoy Your Outdoor Space 

After 15 years in the mosquito prevention business, we’ve seen some really good and some really bad products. Here’s an analysis of some of the most popular ways to screen in an outdoor space.

 

Source: Patioenclusures.com

1) Traditional Framed Screen Porches

Overview:

Traditional framed screen porches have become a popular solution for screening in a porch. This type of screening generally involves 4×6 ft framed sections throughout your porch.

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $4,500 – 5,500
  • Effectiveness*: 99.9% protection
  • Time to Install: 40 hours (professional installation)
  • Lifespan: 10 yrs

Pros:

  • They Look Nice: Traditional framed screen porches generally have a nice aesthetic, and work well for common porch structures.
  • Great Seal: These applications do a good job permanently sealing off your porch from the bugs. Other than the screen door occasionally swinging open, you should be sealed off.
  • Long-lasting: Most applications last between 10 and 15 years.

Cons:

  • Permanent: This solution is permanent. So on days when the bugs aren’t out and you want to pull back the screen, you won’t be able to.
  • Snow Damage: If you live in colder climates, you’ll want to keep a close eye on snow build up during the winter. Too much snow leaning against the frame can cause a break.
  • Installation Time: Installation is typically done by a professional installer, and takes about a full week of work (one person) to install.  
  • Detailed Architecture: If your porch has ornate lathed or tapered columns, you’ll end up framing around them, which may detract from the look of your porch.

Expert Voice:

If you live in areas like FL or HI where biting insects are a permanent problem, it makes sense to seek a permanent solution, but if you live in cooler climates where bug season is short, it may make sense to explore some of the other removable options before investing in permanent screening.

Buy From www.patioenclosures.com

 

Source: mosquitocurtains.com

2) Custom Mesh Curtains

Overview:

This product is relatively new to the market and operates similar to window curtains in your home. Rather than retract up and down like motorized screens, these curtains will retract from side to side and can be pulled back into decorative swags.  

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $850
  • Effectiveness*: 99% protection
  • Time to Install: 5 hours (easy DIY installation)
  • Lifespan: 6 yrs

Pros:

  • Cost-effective: The quality and durability are great for the price, and overall this solution is much less expensive than framed or motorized options.  
  • Non-invasive: Since this option hangs from an elegant tracking system, the installation process won’t interfere with the architecture or columns of the structure.
  • Easy DIY: Installation for these custom curtains typically takes about an afternoon and requires only a few common tools.
  • Flexibility: Because these curtains aren’t framed into the porch, they are easy to pull back or remove. For those not quite ready to commit to a permanent system, mosquito curtains might be a good first step.

Cons:

  • Non-permanent: If you are looking for a permanent screen-in solution, than mosquito curtains aren’t for you.
  • Manual: Mosquito curtains are a manual system that you’ll have to retract yourself.

Expert Voice:

Make sure your provider offers robust stainless steel fasteners as these are a frameless system.  Some low-quality systems use refrigerator magnets for doorway seal that are NOT effective under breezy conditions.  The best systems will use rare earth magnets and rod stiffeners for a far better hold.  Mesh made of a more traditional fabric and quality can vary substantially.  While these systems are the least expensive way to screen a porch, be careful to examine quality.

Buy From mosquitocurtains.com

 

Source: http://www.phantomscreens.com/

3) Motorized Screens

Overview:

The motorized screen option is great for those with a larger budget who don’t want to worry about installation or maintenance. This solution is sure to impress your friends, and could be thought of as the Rolls Royce of porch screening.

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $10,000 – 20,000
  • Effectiveness*: 99.5% protection
  • Time to Install: 40 hours (professional installation)
  • Lifespan: 15 yrs

Pros:

  • Turn Key Service: Most reputable motorized screen companies offer full-service installation. All you’ll have to do is tell them where you want the screens and they’ll do the rest.
  • Flexibility: Motorized screens go up and down at the push of a button. Some even have wind sensors that will automatically retract screens in potentially damaging winds.
  • Long lasting: Most motorized applications last between 15 and 20 years.

Cons:

  • Cost: This is the most expensive screen-in solution on the market. You’ll get what you pay for in value, longevity, and ease of use.
  • DIY Option: If you try to install this option independently, things can go wrong quickly. The system runs on vertical tracks that must be precisely measured and carefully installed.

Expert Voice:

Installation is tricky and if you make a mistake either in precise measurements or installation, it’s on you.  Motorized screens are the premier option of Porch Screening for those who are not budgeted, and are a great way to impress your family and friends.  Most will offer a shade option as well.  

Buy from phantomscreens.com

 

Source: improvementscatalog.com

4) One-Size-Fits-All Curtains

Overview:

  • Cost (34×9 ft. porch): $200
  • Effectiveness: 25% protection
  • Time to Install: 2 hours (easy DIY installation)
  • Lifespan: 2 yrs

Pros:

  • Simple DIY: Since this is a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution, the installation is generally very simple.
  • Affordable: This is generally your cheapest option up front.
  • Non-invasive: Similar to the custom curtain solution, the one-size-fits-all solutions are generally very non-invasive—only requiring a few screws and magnets.

Cons:

  • Poor Quality: One-size-fits-all solutions tend to rip easily, and often only last a season or two.
  • Poor Effectiveness: One of the biggest drawbacks to many of these solutions is that they leave open seams and fly open easily in the wind, allowing bugs to pass through.
  • One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Since every porch is different, it is likely that a one-size fits all solution will not work for every part of your porch. These solutions work better for doorways.

Expert Voice:

Be very careful to examine the quality of the screen material and fastening options. Some products offer cheap screw-in options, and kitchen refrigerator-quality magnets. These systems will easily tear and fall apart quickly in breezy conditions.

Buy From improvementscatalog.com




How We Stopped Mosquitoes from Crashing A Wedding

“Mommy, we’re getting married!”

From the time she was a little girl, I knew this day would come. It was the moment I had been waiting for. Time to plan the wedding I had been fantasizing about all these years. Finally, it was my turn to tearfully watch my little girl glide down the aisle on her proud father’s arm. She would smile sweetly and then gaze with loving eyes at the young man waiting for her at the altar. He would beam at her, his beautiful bride in her exquisite white dress.

“Oh, Sweetheart! That’s wonderful news! I know a beautiful chapel …”

My daughter interrupted me. “No, Mom. We want an outdoor wedding on the water.”

Reality hit. I heard, “There will be mosquitoes.”

She went on. “We found the perfect place! I’ll come by and get you in an hour so you can see it.”

It was a lovely home on 50 acres of land about 20 miles out of town. As we drove up I saw deep green manicured grounds; hundred-year-old oak trees; and a pristine, crystal blue pond. I got out of the car smiling. Within a minute I was slapping my arm, squashing a mosquito who almost succeeded in having me for lunch. With every subsequent slap, all I could think of was our guests getting bit and that sweet little chapel I knew would be perfect for the happy occasion.

Resigning myself to my impending fate, I asked my closest friends for solutions. There were many.

“Mosquitos hate dryer sheets. You can pass them out to all of your guests and put them on their chairs and inside their clothing!”

“Lavender! You can put pots of lavender all around. Mosquitos hate lavender.”

“How about some mosquito zappers? I heard they work well.”

“Mosquito repellent! You can get someone to come out and spray.”

“Citronella candles!”

Then, one glorious day, the groom’s mother gave me a call. “I hear the kids want their wedding at my brother’s place by the pond. The mosquitoes are horrible out there. I thought I’d let you know about a very nice outdoor wedding I went to last year. My friend used mosquito curtains to keep the bugs out.”

“Mosquito curtains?”

Mosquito Netting for a Wedding

“She found a company online that custom makes mosquito curtains. They decorated the mosquito curtains with flowers. It really was lovely. We were able to enjoy the freshness and view of the outdoors without getting attacked by mosquitos. It was one of the prettiest weddings I have ever seen. I was so impressed that I ordered some mosquito curtains for my front porch. I really like them.”

I mulled it over.

“Why don’t you come over and see for yourself? I’ll show you the photos I took at that wedding.”

Was this was the solution I had been waiting for? Not only would my daughter be happy, but according to what I just heard, the wedding could be memorable for all the right reasons.

As I drove up to the lovely Victorian, I was struck by the white mosquito netting draped decoratively around the front porch. My hostess led to the front porch where she had food and drinks waiting to be served.

“Where did you get the mosquito curtains?” I asked.

“I found the company online. They are called, Mosquito Curtains. Really nice people and easy to work with. Kurt explained to me about the netting. See? There are 800 tiny little squares in every square inch. No bugs can get through. Not even no-see-ums.”

“I didn’t know what to expect. These are really nice.”

“We used to have a terrible time with mosquitos. Believe me, I have tried everything. Citronella candles, dryer sheets… I even bought one of those mosquito zappers. I love my mosquito curtains. I threw them in the wash once and they came out good as new. It really is a great product.”  

For the wedding, we draped two large tents with mosquito netting and decorated them with small pink roses (my daughter’s favorite). I am happy to say, the wedding was really nice. My daughter was beautiful; her husband, handsome. The musicians played well, the food was delicious and everyone had a good time. Thanks to the mosquito netting, no one was eaten up with those pesky unwanted guests that are so good at ruining a celebration.

Not only did Mosquito Curtains help with the wedding, I now have mosquito netting on myfront porch. My new fantasy is about the day I will play there with my grandchildren. It will be soon. My daughter is expecting in the spring.

“Mommy, we’re getting married!”

From the time she was a little girl, I knew this day would come. It was the moment I had been waiting for. Time to plan the wedding I had been fantasizing about all these years. Finally, it was my turn to tearfully watch my little girl glide down the aisle on her proud father’s arm. She would smile sweetly and then gaze with loving eyes at the young man waiting for her at the altar. He would beam at her, his beautiful bride in her exquisite white dress.

“Oh, Sweetheart! That’s wonderful news! I know a beautiful chapel …”

My daughter interrupted me. “No, Mom. We want an outdoor wedding on the water.”

Reality hit. I heard, “There will be mosquitoes.”

She went on. “We found the perfect place! I’ll come by and get you in an hour so you can see it.”

It was a lovely home on 50 acres of land about 20 miles out of town. As we drove up I saw deep green manicured grounds; hundred-year-old oak trees; and a pristine, crystal blue pond. I got out of the car smiling. Within a minute I was slapping my arm, squashing a mosquito who almost succeeded in having me for lunch. With every subsequent slap, all I could think of was our guests getting bit and that sweet little chapel I knew would be perfect for the happy occasion.

Resigning myself to my impending fate, I asked my closest friends for solutions. There were many.

“Mosquitos hate dryer sheets. You can pass them out to all of your guests and put them on their chairs and inside their clothing!”

“Lavender! You can put pots of lavender all around. Mosquitos hate lavender.”

“How about some mosquito zappers? I heard they work well.”

“Mosquito repellent! You can get someone to come out and spray.”

“Citronella candles!”

Then, one glorious day, the groom’s mother gave me a call. “I hear the kids want their wedding at my brother’s place by the pond. The mosquitoes are horrible out there. I thought I’d let you know about a very nice outdoor wedding I went to last year. My friend used mosquito curtains to keep the bugs out.”

“Mosquito curtains?”

Mosquito Netting for a Wedding

“She found a company online that custom makes mosquito curtains. They decorated the mosquito curtains with flowers. It really was lovely. We were able to enjoy the freshness and view of the outdoors without getting attacked by mosquitos. It was one of the prettiest weddings I have ever seen. I was so impressed that I ordered some mosquito curtains for my front porch. I really like them.”

I mulled it over.

“Why don’t you come over and see for yourself? I’ll show you the photos I took at that wedding.”

Was this was the solution I had been waiting for? Not only would my daughter be happy, but according to what I just heard, the wedding could be memorable for all the right reasons.

As I drove up to the lovely Victorian, I was struck by the white mosquito netting draped decoratively around the front porch. My hostess led to the front porch where she had food and drinks waiting to be served.

“Where did you get the mosquito curtains?” I asked.

“I found the company online. They are called, Mosquito Curtains. Really nice people and easy to work with. Kurt explained to me about the netting. See? There are 800 tiny little squares in every square inch. No bugs can get through. Not even no-see-ums.”

“I didn’t know what to expect. These are really nice.”

“We used to have a terrible time with mosquitos. Believe me, I have tried everything. Citronella candles, dryer sheets… I even bought one of those mosquito zappers. I love my mosquito curtains. I threw them in the wash once and they came out good as new. It really is a great product.”  

For the wedding, we draped two large tents with mosquito netting and decorated them with small pink roses (my daughter’s favorite). I am happy to say, the wedding was really nice. My daughter was beautiful; her husband, handsome. The musicians played well, the food was delicious and everyone had a good time. Thanks to the mosquito netting, no one was eaten up with those pesky unwanted guests that are so good at ruining a celebration.

Not only did Mosquito Curtains help with the wedding, I now have mosquito netting on myfront porch. My new fantasy is about the day I will play there with my grandchildren. It will be soon. My daughter is expecting in the spring.




How Mosquitoes Helped Us Win the American Revolution

Mosquitoes did not exist in the Americas at all before 1492. Historians speculate that they arrived from West Africa on the transatlantic slave ships during the Columbian Exchange. Gradually, the mosquito colonized parts of the Americas with inviting breeding grounds, and for centuries they have wreaked havoc on the human populace as the primary carrier for yellow fever, malaria, and the dengue virus.

The particular breed of mosquito that carries yellow fever is Aedes aegypti, also known as the “yellow fever mosquito.” This breed has a strong preference for human blood, making it an efficient spreader of human disease. The fact that it likes to hang around human activities distinguishes it from the thousands of other mosquito species, making it, in effect, a domesticated animal. Because the Aedes aegypti prefers humans, this breed of mosquito will lay its eggs in containers such as pots, barrels, wells, or water tanks.

The Fervor of “the Fever”

Although the mosquito is small, its ability to spread yellow fever have actually decided the fate of great empires. In 1697, the kingdom of Scotland attempted to establish a trading colony on the Caribbean shore of Panama, called New Caledonia. New Caledonia offered a generous share of the profits to anyone who was willing to work in the new Pacific and Atlantic trading networks. Unfortunately, the Scots’ immune systems were unprepared for yellow fever, dengue, and malaria. Sadly, within two years, 70 percent of the 2500 eager Scottish volunteers were dead.

At end of the 18th century, the mosquitoes actually helped the American colonies win their liberty from Britain. Because the British troops had almost no experience with malaria, they had no resistance to it. On the contrary, some American militiamen and much of the Continental Army had grown up in the South and faced malaria every summer of their lives. In the summer of 1780, the British Army suffered a malaria epidemic. This was particularly intense in South Carolina and there were many times when half of the British Army was too sick to move. No one knew that mosquitoes carried malaria, and the British did not have the means to combat it.

Lord Charles Cornwallis

The next year, in 1781, the British commander, Lord Cornwallis, decided to move his army north into the hills of Virginia, in order to avoid “the fatal sickness which so nearly ruined the army” the summer before. Unfortunately for Cornwallis, malaria still took hold of his army later that summer and once again, over 50 percent of his men were too sick to stand duty. The New England Continental Army and its French allies stayed healthy until the surrender, partly due to the fact that they had only just arrived in Virginia and malaria had not had time to do its worst. Also, many of them were resistant because of prior experience with malaria. Cornwallis surrendered in October of that year, which, in effect, decided the outcome of the American Revolution. Thus, we can say with confidence that it was fever-spreading mosquitoes that helped determine our American independence.

The Nuisance Exposed

It wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that mosquitoes were finally exposed as the perpetrators of malaria, yellow fever, and dengue. When this was discovered, antidotes spread like wildfire. The American government provided a budget to eradicate mosquitoes, and researchers set to work on creating pesticides, like DDT. By the 1940s the mosquito population was finally under control.

Today, mosquitoes are once again inhabiting populated areas, giving rise to environmental concerns with the chemicals used to eradicate them. Thanks to modern medicine, citizens of developed countries do not have to be concerned about epidemics of yellow fever and malaria. However, the government and private companies alike continue to find solutions to reduce the chance of suffering uncomfortable mosquito bites. With the advance of new technology, Mosquito Curtains hopes to join many others in providing protection in the great outdoors.

Mosquitoes did not exist in the Americas at all before 1492. Historians speculate that they arrived from West Africa on the transatlantic slave ships during the Columbian Exchange. Gradually, the mosquito colonized parts of the Americas with inviting breeding grounds, and for centuries they have wreaked havoc on the human populace as the primary carrier for yellow fever, malaria, and the dengue virus.

The particular breed of mosquito that carries yellow fever is Aedes aegypti, also known as the “yellow fever mosquito.” This breed has a strong preference for human blood, making it an efficient spreader of human disease. The fact that it likes to hang around human activities distinguishes it from the thousands of other mosquito species, making it, in effect, a domesticated animal. Because the Aedes aegypti prefers humans, this breed of mosquito will lay its eggs in containers such as pots, barrels, wells, or water tanks.

The Fervor of “the Fever”

Although the mosquito is small, its ability to spread yellow fever have actually decided the fate of great empires. In 1697, the kingdom of Scotland attempted to establish a trading colony on the Caribbean shore of Panama, called New Caledonia. New Caledonia offered a generous share of the profits to anyone who was willing to work in the new Pacific and Atlantic trading networks. Unfortunately, the Scots’ immune systems were unprepared for yellow fever, dengue, and malaria. Sadly, within two years, 70 percent of the 2500 eager Scottish volunteers were dead.

At end of the 18th century, the mosquitoes actually helped the American colonies win their liberty from Britain. Because the British troops had almost no experience with malaria, they had no resistance to it. On the contrary, some American militiamen and much of the Continental Army had grown up in the South and faced malaria every summer of their lives. In the summer of 1780, the British Army suffered a malaria epidemic. This was particularly intense in South Carolina and there were many times when half of the British Army was too sick to move. No one knew that mosquitoes carried malaria, and the British did not have the means to combat it.

Lord Charles Cornwallis

The next year, in 1781, the British commander, Lord Cornwallis, decided to move his army north into the hills of Virginia, in order to avoid “the fatal sickness which so nearly ruined the army” the summer before. Unfortunately for Cornwallis, malaria still took hold of his army later that summer and once again, over 50 percent of his men were too sick to stand duty. The New England Continental Army and its French allies stayed healthy until the surrender, partly due to the fact that they had only just arrived in Virginia and malaria had not had time to do its worst. Also, many of them were resistant because of prior experience with malaria. Cornwallis surrendered in October of that year, which, in effect, decided the outcome of the American Revolution. Thus, we can say with confidence that it was fever-spreading mosquitoes that helped determine our American independence.

The Nuisance Exposed

It wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that mosquitoes were finally exposed as the perpetrators of malaria, yellow fever, and dengue. When this was discovered, antidotes spread like wildfire. The American government provided a budget to eradicate mosquitoes, and researchers set to work on creating pesticides, like DDT. By the 1940s the mosquito population was finally under control.

Today, mosquitoes are once again inhabiting populated areas, giving rise to environmental concerns with the chemicals used to eradicate them. Thanks to modern medicine, citizens of developed countries do not have to be concerned about epidemics of yellow fever and malaria. However, the government and private companies alike continue to find solutions to reduce the chance of suffering uncomfortable mosquito bites. With the advance of new technology, Mosquito Curtains hopes to join many others in providing protection in the great outdoors.




Gazebos: Then and Now

For thousands of years, gazebos have provided shade and shelter for those of us who enjoy the peace and solitude nature has to offer. We see them in town squares, in beautiful gardens, and on the banks of lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. Gazebos serve as a private getaway to sit and relax while enjoying the beauty of the great outdoors.

A History of Gazebos

Five thousand years ago the Egyptians built the first garden gazebos to support grapevines for wine and raisins. They believed that gazebos and gardens were their earthly paradises and would follow them to heaven. Later, the Romans used gazebos as private sanctuaries; the Greeks, as shrines to honor gods and goddesses.

In the 14th century, the French government built four open-air structures for people to sit and enjoy the beautifully manicured gardens at the Louvre. This French style of sitting outdoors was recreated in other countries.  By the 15th century this design and lifestyle had become enormously popular in England, where they were constructed with the intention of allowing their owners to admire their colorful Elizabethan gardens. Most often, they were designed much like the main house and used for entertaining guests. 

Historic Spanish Gazebo

During the late 1700s in England and other parts of Europe, these structures, now styled after Chinese summerhouses, were popping up in gardens everywhere. It was this type of architecture that eventually led to the word gazebo. It is speculated that the word was created by William Halfpenny, a prolific architectural writer, when he playfully added the Latin word ebo, which means “to look,” to the word gaze.

In America, gazebos became popular in the mid-1800s with the prosperity of the new middle class. They declined in popularity around the turn of the century when houses with grand porches replaced the need for a separate open-air setting. Gazebos became popular again in the 1930s, likely due to their rising reputation as a quiet retreat from the anxieties and chaos surrounding the Great Depression. Eventually, gazebos became status symbols in the home. 

In the 1940s, porches again took over the lead in outdoor seating, causing a decrease in gazebo popularity. In the 1980s, the trend flipped and a huge market formed for fashionable gazebos, which continues today.

Form & Function

Gazebos add a personal touch to any landscape and can be customized to any preference and style. They can be round, square, octagonal, or rectangular; small or large; ornate or plain; elegant or even rustic. Vinyl gazebos are among the most popular because they are constructed of durable plastic and are virtually maintenance-free. Metal gazebos are the most stable type and difficult to vandalize, making them well-suited for public settings such as golf courses, outdoor concert arenas, and parks. Wood and cedar gazebos fit in well with natural surroundings and can be customized with flower boxes, benches, and decorative trim.

Kurt Jordan, owner of mosquitocurtains.com and an expert in working with outdoor structures, tells his customers that the best way to choose a well-built gazebo is to simply lean on it. If the support gives way at all or feels flimsy, it is probably not going to be a good choice. A sturdy gazebo is critical to ensure durability and potential for enhancement, such as protecting its occupants from bugs. One of Kurt’s favorite applications of the mosquito netting he sells is helping his customers find that protection without losing the ambience and tranquility of nature’s view.

“Dark mosquito netting on gazebos is like having tinted windows and still you can breathe in the freshness and natural scents of the air,” says Kurt. “One of our customers built a gazebo on her property in the piney woods of East Texas. She has created a beautiful space near a small creek where she goes to read and takes in the smell of the fresh pine trees and oaks.”

No-see-um netting used for a wedding

The finely woven, white “no see-um netting” is especially popular in the South, particularly on homes that have big porches and gazebos. Kurt says, “I always ask our customers to send in photos of their gazebos and porches after they have hung our mosquito and no-see-um netting. Some of them are very creative and have turned out really, really nice.” One customer even used the netting for a wedding, decorating it with white ribbon and flowers!

Conclusion

Gazebos, much like their storied history, are used not only for peace and relaxation, but also for outdoor entertainment and events. Lately, there are many options to enhance your experience of it. Consider installing mosquito netting to decorate your gazebo and avoid those unwanted bugs who seem to always show up to crash a good time. 

For thousands of years, gazebos have provided shade and shelter for those of us who enjoy the peace and solitude nature has to offer. We see them in town squares, in beautiful gardens, and on the banks of lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. Gazebos serve as a private getaway to sit and relax while enjoying the beauty of the great outdoors.

A History of Gazebos

Five thousand years ago the Egyptians built the first garden gazebos to support grapevines for wine and raisins. They believed that gazebos and gardens were their earthly paradises and would follow them to heaven. Later, the Romans used gazebos as private sanctuaries; the Greeks, as shrines to honor gods and goddesses.

In the 14th century, the French government built four open-air structures for people to sit and enjoy the beautifully manicured gardens at the Louvre. This French style of sitting outdoors was recreated in other countries.  By the 15th century this design and lifestyle had become enormously popular in England, where they were constructed with the intention of allowing their owners to admire their colorful Elizabethan gardens. Most often, they were designed much like the main house and used for entertaining guests. 

Historic Spanish Gazebo

During the late 1700s in England and other parts of Europe, these structures, now styled after Chinese summerhouses, were popping up in gardens everywhere. It was this type of architecture that eventually led to the word gazebo. It is speculated that the word was created by William Halfpenny, a prolific architectural writer, when he playfully added the Latin word ebo, which means “to look,” to the word gaze.

In America, gazebos became popular in the mid-1800s with the prosperity of the new middle class. They declined in popularity around the turn of the century when houses with grand porches replaced the need for a separate open-air setting. Gazebos became popular again in the 1930s, likely due to their rising reputation as a quiet retreat from the anxieties and chaos surrounding the Great Depression. Eventually, gazebos became status symbols in the home. 

In the 1940s, porches again took over the lead in outdoor seating, causing a decrease in gazebo popularity. In the 1980s, the trend flipped and a huge market formed for fashionable gazebos, which continues today.

Form & Function

Gazebos add a personal touch to any landscape and can be customized to any preference and style. They can be round, square, octagonal, or rectangular; small or large; ornate or plain; elegant or even rustic. Vinyl gazebos are among the most popular because they are constructed of durable plastic and are virtually maintenance-free. Metal gazebos are the most stable type and difficult to vandalize, making them well-suited for public settings such as golf courses, outdoor concert arenas, and parks. Wood and cedar gazebos fit in well with natural surroundings and can be customized with flower boxes, benches, and decorative trim.

Kurt Jordan, owner of mosquitocurtains.com and an expert in working with outdoor structures, tells his customers that the best way to choose a well-built gazebo is to simply lean on it. If the support gives way at all or feels flimsy, it is probably not going to be a good choice. A sturdy gazebo is critical to ensure durability and potential for enhancement, such as protecting its occupants from bugs. One of Kurt’s favorite applications of the mosquito netting he sells is helping his customers find that protection without losing the ambience and tranquility of nature’s view.

“Dark mosquito netting on gazebos is like having tinted windows and still you can breathe in the freshness and natural scents of the air,” says Kurt. “One of our customers built a gazebo on her property in the piney woods of East Texas. She has created a beautiful space near a small creek where she goes to read and takes in the smell of the fresh pine trees and oaks.”

No-see-um netting used for a wedding

The finely woven, white “no see-um netting” is especially popular in the South, particularly on homes that have big porches and gazebos. Kurt says, “I always ask our customers to send in photos of their gazebos and porches after they have hung our mosquito and no-see-um netting. Some of them are very creative and have turned out really, really nice.” One customer even used the netting for a wedding, decorating it with white ribbon and flowers!

Conclusion

Gazebos, much like their storied history, are used not only for peace and relaxation, but also for outdoor entertainment and events. Lately, there are many options to enhance your experience of it. Consider installing mosquito netting to decorate your gazebo and avoid those unwanted bugs who seem to always show up to crash a good time. 




How to Cope With Pollen in Porches and Gazebos

Do you, like me, come home every day to insane amounts of pollen, covering your picnic table or outdoor space? Spring is just starting and I want to enjoy my patio every day, but my kids have such bad allergic reactions to ragweed that I can’t just leave the pollen there to blow away on its own. So I feel like I’m constantly cleaning. True, it’s the season for spring cleaning, but there there has to be a better way to protect against the constant dust and irritants floating around my outdoor space!

I think I have a few options: (1) Clean it all the time, over and over again; (2) Invest in a slightly more permanent solution one-time to cut down on my repeated cleaning.

Here are two solutions you can do yourself without breaking your budget to cut down on the time you spend focused on cleaning ragweed this summer.

Clear Vinyl Plastic Panels

Vinyl Paneling on a Patio

You could purchase some vinyl panels, which are made of a flexible marine-grade vinyl plastic. They are commonly used in conjunction with a space heater to create a warm space during the winter months, but they are perfectly dense. You can often mount these directly to the top of your porch, and while there are tiny incidental gaps around the edges, these panels will keep 95% of the pollen off your porch. Another advantage to vinyl panels is that you can remove them when your pollen season is over, so your porch can still be the aesthetic centerpiece of your backyard.

Summer Insect Curtains

Black Mosquito Netting Enclosure

While not quite as effective as vinyl panels, you can also purchase mesh curtains designed to keep mosquitoes and other summer bugs out. The amount of pollen blocked will depend upon the tightness of the mesh. (The larger the hole count per square inch, the smaller the hole size will be.) The best mesh to use is an 800 hole per sq inch no-see-um mesh that is used to block a very tiny biting fly commonly called a no-see-um. The cool part of this product is that you kind of get double-value since the mesh will block 80% of your pollen while also protecting you from irritating mosquitoes.

Finally, black no-see-um meshes offer outstanding visibility and are easy to throw in the wash after the pollen season is over.

Do you, like me, come home every day to insane amounts of pollen, covering your picnic table or outdoor space? Spring is just starting and I want to enjoy my patio every day, but my kids have such bad allergic reactions to ragweed that I can’t just leave the pollen there to blow away on its own. So I feel like I’m constantly cleaning. True, it’s the season for spring cleaning, but there there has to be a better way to protect against the constant dust and irritants floating around my outdoor space!

I think I have a few options: (1) Clean it all the time, over and over again; (2) Invest in a slightly more permanent solution one-time to cut down on my repeated cleaning.

Here are two solutions you can do yourself without breaking your budget to cut down on the time you spend focused on cleaning ragweed this summer.

Clear Vinyl Plastic Panels

Vinyl Paneling on a Patio

You could purchase some vinyl panels, which are made of a flexible marine-grade vinyl plastic. They are commonly used in conjunction with a space heater to create a warm space during the winter months, but they are perfectly dense. You can often mount these directly to the top of your porch, and while there are tiny incidental gaps around the edges, these panels will keep 95% of the pollen off your porch. Another advantage to vinyl panels is that you can remove them when your pollen season is over, so your porch can still be the aesthetic centerpiece of your backyard.

Summer Insect Curtains

Black Mosquito Netting Enclosure

While not quite as effective as vinyl panels, you can also purchase mesh curtains designed to keep mosquitoes and other summer bugs out. The amount of pollen blocked will depend upon the tightness of the mesh. (The larger the hole count per square inch, the smaller the hole size will be.) The best mesh to use is an 800 hole per sq inch no-see-um mesh that is used to block a very tiny biting fly commonly called a no-see-um. The cool part of this product is that you kind of get double-value since the mesh will block 80% of your pollen while also protecting you from irritating mosquitoes.

Finally, black no-see-um meshes offer outstanding visibility and are easy to throw in the wash after the pollen season is over.




Mosquito Enclosures For Decks

If biting insects are keeping you from enjoying your deck, consider these solutions available to you.  We want to help you navigate these alternatives so that you don’t waste your money on poor quality products.

Insect deck enclosures require some overhead structure to hang mosquito netting.  It can be as simple as an umbrella, pergola, awning, or even a temporary frame made of 2-3” PVC.  Alternatively, it can be more complicated, like building a screen room or at least a covered roof.

In addition, there are other solutions like chemical spraying or strategically positioned electric fans to create a wind barrier for these biting insects that only fly in the still night air.  Before you make the investment, we’d like to help you avoid common mistakes.

Read specifics for creating deck screens.

Mosquito Enclosures For Decks

If biting insects are keeping you from enjoying your deck, consider these solutions available to you.  We want to help you navigate these alternatives so that you don’t waste your money on poor quality products.

Insect deck enclosures require some overhead structure to hang mosquito netting.  It can be as simple as an umbrella, pergola, awning, or even a temporary frame made of 2-3” PVC.  Alternatively, it can be more complicated, like building a screen room or at least a covered roof.

In addition, there are other solutions like chemical spraying or strategically positioned electric fans to create a wind barrier for these biting insects that only fly in the still night air.  Before you make the investment, we’d like to help you avoid common mistakes.

Umbrella Nets

Umbrella nets can cost anywhere from $17 to $800, but with this product, you get what you pay for.  Cheaper nets cannot withstand any amount of wind and are very fragile.  Bug Umbrellasells a very high-quality umbrella net that will last many years.  In addition it has many clever features that make it easy to roll up and store away when not in use.

Awning Screen Enclosures

An awning will also provide shade, but if looking to enclose an awning with mosquito netting, do not buy a retractable awning. Retractable awnings require the complete removal of the netting every time it is retracted. The more the netting is secured for wind, the more effort and time it takes to remove and rehang the enclosure, taking as long as 45 minutes. Thus, we highly recommend installing a fixed awning.  Custom mosquito curtain panels are available with top grommets that “zip tie” to the overhead bar. 

Pergola Screens

A pergola has an open roof.  When considering the design, keep in mind that there needs to be a “seal” at the top of the curtains to prevent mosquitoes from finding their way in. Some pergola designs have odd shapes with stacked rafters that make them impossible to seal.  Look for clean, flat fastening surfaces.  In its simplest, least expensive form, all that is really needed to hang mosquito netting panels is an overhead box.  If making the box out of wood, consider cedar, which lasts as long as pressure-treated wood but weighs far less.

Gazebo Kits


Many home improvement stores offer aluminum gazebos with screen kits.  While gazebos may look impressive on the showroom floor, most will not pass the key test: to lean against a support column to see if it wobbles or “racks”.  Yardistry makes a very nice gazebo that is structurally solid.  The better models are initially more expensive, but will last much longer and return more value in the long run.

Often these gazebos come with mosquito nets as part of the kit, but it’s a good idea to inspect the quality of the net as many are tissue paper-thin and will last only a year or two.  Most importantly, replacement nets for some models are virtually impossible to find, despite what the store may say. Replacement nets are frequently carried online only and/or marked as “out of stock.” The good news is that there are companies that will custom make replacement panels of substantially higher quality, but they can cost $600 – $1,000.

Create A Simple Overhead Box

 

This can be made out of wood or 2-3” PVC.  Avoid narrower gauge PVC as it will be too unstable and sag like a noodle.  If the box is attached to the house, you can enter the enclosure as soon as you open your doors.  Some companies offer affordable custom-made panels and an overhead shade mesh that will also keep out flying insects.

 

Electric Fans

This is surprisingly effective if done correctly.  Mosquitoes are terrible fliers, as are most biting insects.  Your goal is to surround yourself with a curtain of air that will keep biting insects away.  It isn’t a perfect solution since fans may need to be situated very specifically given your conditions, and the drone of fans can make conversation difficult.  However, if you already have a few household fans, it is certainly worth a try.

Get Creative

As mentioned earlier, screening prevents you from retracting the awning.  However, this owner of a retractable awning created an “upside down box” and rigged it between vertical poles. As a result, the moment they walk out their back door, they are in a protected space.  Since the awning is beneath the deck screen enclosure, they can retract the awning whenever they choose.




Where Is The Mosquito Capitol?

Why Do Mosquitoes Seem More Intense In Northern Climates?

When you think of mosquitoes, you typically think of warm muggy climates common in southern states.  But ask anyone north of Ohio and they will describe concentrated swarms of mosquitoes that would send even Lewis & Clark indoors.

If you’ve ever heard that whirring high pitched whine of a mosquito, you know just how aggravating they can be. Many of our clients claimed that they lived in the mosquito capital of the world… so we did a little research.

Mosquito Curtains Inc. makes mosquito netting curtains as alternative to permanent screen porch enclosures. The owner says, “We were surprised to find that sales were highest in northern states.” Based in Atlanta, we thought we lived in Mosquito-land, yet more than a half dozen northern states and Canada claim the mosquito as their state bird.” Owner, Kurt Jordan, searched for answers, “Sure there are factors such as architectural style, lifestyle, and potential snow damage to permanent screening; however, the intensity of mosquito concentrations in the north prompted us to speak to a few entomologists.”

Female mosquitoes drink blood because it contains certain proteins that enable it to lay eggs. They are attracted to their hosts by light colors, body heat, humidity released during perspiration, and carbon dioxide. While there are other chemical factors, the tastiest victims seem to be those with higher metabolisms or those exerting themselves outdoors. Stand outside with a rake in your hand stimulating your metabolism and you wear a neon sign that says, “Dinner here.”

When the days shorten and temperatures drop, adult females and their larvae are able to enter a low metabolism stage called diapause. During this phase, a gene switches the mosquito diet from blood to fats and sugars. Mosquitoes in diapause will live in tree holes, basements, and many survive the winter in semi-hibernation. Eggs will immediately become dormant and await the warmer season to develop. If conditions are just so, larvae will enter diapause sooner than the egg laying females and dormant eggs will accumulate. And then comes the spring when mosquitoes awake from their winter sleep. Snow melt provides prolonged saturation ideal for breeding. Eggs that have accumulated during the fall season begin to hatch. Invertebrate predators of the mosquito won’t awake for another month, and the first weeks of spring become the high season for mosquito nursery rhymes, free love and few predators to send them to mosquito heaven. If you think that mosquitoes are killed by extreme temperatures, think again. Mosquito species even live in Antarctica, though hibernate 11 months of the year.

“Southern States have a longer persistent season,” says Jordan. “The architecture and lifestyle has made permanent screening a more common norm.

Northerners take their short warm seasons more seriously and enjoy the outdoors while they can. Architecture in the north seems to place more emphasis on the character of the porch over protection for a relatively short season and a removable screen enclosure seems to just fit.”

Execution by Mosquito

According to Jerry Hogsette, leading mosquito entomologist at the USDA, “Many years ago in Alaska, a cruel form of execution was to strip a man naked and send him down the Yukon River in a canoe. The mosquitoes were so thick, death generally occurred by suffocation. If that didn’t kill the poor guy, he would die of blood loss or de-sanguination.

Mosquito Netting Curtains

Nothing is more effective than a physical barrier to separate you from mosquitoes. Mosquito curtains are a removable and washable alternative to permanent screening. Originally designed for upscale homes, they are elegant and attractive, yet are much more affordable than traditional screening. Mosquito Curtains are offered in various colors such as White, Ivory, and Black as well as a “no-see-um” mesh for coastal sand flies. A typical 35 ft. porch cost $550 – $750 and may be hung using a variety of attachment methods including curtain tracking similar to what is used for hospital privacy curtains.

Why Do Mosquitoes Seem More Intense In Northern Climates?

When you think of mosquitoes, you typically think of warm muggy climates common in southern states.  But ask anyone north of Ohio and they will describe concentrated swarms of mosquitoes that would send even Lewis & Clark indoors.

If you’ve ever heard that whirring high pitched whine of a mosquito, you know just how aggravating they can be. Many of our clients claimed that they lived in the mosquito capital of the world… so we did a little research.

Mosquito Curtains Inc. makes mosquito netting curtains as alternative to permanent screen porch enclosures. The owner says, “We were surprised to find that sales were highest in northern states.” Based in Atlanta, we thought we lived in Mosquito-land, yet more than a half dozen northern states and Canada claim the mosquito as their state bird.” Owner, Kurt Jordan, searched for answers, “Sure there are factors such as architectural style, lifestyle, and potential snow damage to permanent screening; however, the intensity of mosquito concentrations in the north prompted us to speak to a few entomologists.”

Female mosquitoes drink blood because it contains certain proteins that enable it to lay eggs. They are attracted to their hosts by light colors, body heat, humidity released during perspiration, and carbon dioxide. While there are other chemical factors, the tastiest victims seem to be those with higher metabolisms or those exerting themselves outdoors. Stand outside with a rake in your hand stimulating your metabolism and you wear a neon sign that says, “Dinner here.”

When the days shorten and temperatures drop, adult females and their larvae are able to enter a low metabolism stage called diapause. During this phase, a gene switches the mosquito diet from blood to fats and sugars. Mosquitoes in diapause will live in tree holes, basements, and many survive the winter in semi-hibernation. Eggs will immediately become dormant and await the warmer season to develop. If conditions are just so, larvae will enter diapause sooner than the egg laying females and dormant eggs will accumulate. And then comes the spring when mosquitoes awake from their winter sleep. Snow melt provides prolonged saturation ideal for breeding. Eggs that have accumulated during the fall season begin to hatch. Invertebrate predators of the mosquito won’t awake for another month, and the first weeks of spring become the high season for mosquito nursery rhymes, free love and few predators to send them to mosquito heaven. If you think that mosquitoes are killed by extreme temperatures, think again. Mosquito species even live in Antarctica, though hibernate 11 months of the year.

“Southern States have a longer persistent season,” says Jordan. “The architecture and lifestyle has made permanent screening a more common norm.

Northerners take their short warm seasons more seriously and enjoy the outdoors while they can. Architecture in the north seems to place more emphasis on the character of the porch over protection for a relatively short season and a removable screen enclosure seems to just fit.”

Execution by Mosquito

According to Jerry Hogsette, leading mosquito entomologist at the USDA, “Many years ago in Alaska, a cruel form of execution was to strip a man naked and send him down the Yukon River in a canoe. The mosquitoes were so thick, death generally occurred by suffocation. If that didn’t kill the poor guy, he would die of blood loss or de-sanguination.

Mosquito Netting Curtains

Nothing is more effective than a physical barrier to separate you from mosquitoes. Mosquito curtains are a removable and washable alternative to permanent screening. Originally designed for upscale homes, they are elegant and attractive, yet are much more affordable than traditional screening. Mosquito Curtains are offered in various colors such as White, Ivory, and Black as well as a “no-see-um” mesh for coastal sand flies. A typical 35 ft. porch cost $550 – $750 and may be hung using a variety of attachment methods including curtain tracking similar to what is used for hospital privacy curtains.




Is Your Porch Too Beautiful To Screen?

(FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:) Take a walk down the streets of any historic neighborhood and it is easy to see the allure of a grand old porch. Each genre of architecture has its own unique way of celebrating this inviting sanctuary that links the home with the surroundings of outdoor life. Sadly, a charming porch will often remain vacant during mosquito season as homeowners are reluctant to destroy its lovely character with permanent screening. 

“This is exactly the dilemma we faced,” says Kurt Jordan of Mosquito Curtains Inc., “I wasn’t about to spend thousands of dollars to ruin our porch with what I considered to be a permanent eye sore. Yet, watching your children served up as the main course is enough to make your blood boil.” The Jordans were propelled into action and made, what was to become, the first prototype of a brand new product; a mosquito curtain that is easily removable and complimentary to the porch.” 

During the next few seasons, the Jordans received many compliments on the billowing curtains that many neighbors assumed were merely decorative. “We continued to experiment with various fabrics and hanging techniques including Velcro® tape and tracking used for hospital privacy curtains. Now, we are able to offer seamless curtains up to 12’ tall for virtually any length and shape.” 

The company’s website, www.mosquitocurtains.com has shipped more than 43,000 orders in the first three seasons of operation to customers in the United States and abroad. Mosquito Curtains appeal to both owners of upscale residences who appreciate its pleasing aesthetics, and budgeted home owners who appreciate an 80% cost savings compared to a professionally installed framed screen. A typical 40’L x 10’H curtain with attachment kit costs $390 and optional tracking costs about $4.00/ft. 

“Surprisingly, we sell more curtains north of Ohio than south,” Jordan says. “Evidently, those in the north place a premium on enjoying a shorter warm season and must also endure swarming black flies. Also, homeowners with covenant restrictions for permanent screening are finding Mosquito Curtains to be their only permitted alternative.” 

The durable, knitted and heat-cured polyester is easy to care for and comes in three neutrals: white, ivory and black. The airy Mosquito Curtain is machine washable and is custom designed to fit most porch, gazebo or under deck configurations. Curtains are delivered in 2-5 business days and self-installation is quick and easy using only household tools. 

“A front porch is like a pair of outstretched arms inviting visitors into the heart of your home,” says Jordan. “We are able to enjoy our porch so much more during the warm season and still have a good old-fashioned open porch during the cooler months. Mosquito Curtains provide a pleasing sanctuary for friends and family.” 

The Mosquito Curtain is a product of Georgia-based Mosquito Curtains Inc. For more information on the Mosquito Curtain or to place an order, you can visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.
(FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:) Take a walk down the streets of any historic neighborhood and it is easy to see the allure of a grand old porch. Each genre of architecture has its own unique way of celebrating this inviting sanctuary that links the home with the surroundings of outdoor life. Sadly, a charming porch will often remain vacant during mosquito season as homeowners are reluctant to destroy its lovely character with permanent screening. 

“This is exactly the dilemma we faced,” says Kurt Jordan of Mosquito Curtains Inc., “I wasn’t about to spend thousands of dollars to ruin our porch with what I considered to be a permanent eye sore. Yet, watching your children served up as the main course is enough to make your blood boil.” The Jordans were propelled into action and made, what was to become, the first prototype of a brand new product; a mosquito curtain that is easily removable and complimentary to the porch.” 

During the next few seasons, the Jordans received many compliments on the billowing curtains that many neighbors assumed were merely decorative. “We continued to experiment with various fabrics and hanging techniques including Velcro® tape and tracking used for hospital privacy curtains. Now, we are able to offer seamless curtains up to 12’ tall for virtually any length and shape.” 

The company’s website, www.mosquitocurtains.com has shipped more than 43,000 orders in the first three seasons of operation to customers in the United States and abroad. Mosquito Curtains appeal to both owners of upscale residences who appreciate its pleasing aesthetics, and budgeted home owners who appreciate an 80% cost savings compared to a professionally installed framed screen. A typical 40’L x 10’H curtain with attachment kit costs $390 and optional tracking costs about $4.00/ft. 

“Surprisingly, we sell more curtains north of Ohio than south,” Jordan says. “Evidently, those in the north place a premium on enjoying a shorter warm season and must also endure swarming black flies. Also, homeowners with covenant restrictions for permanent screening are finding Mosquito Curtains to be their only permitted alternative.” 

The durable, knitted and heat-cured polyester is easy to care for and comes in three neutrals: white, ivory and black. The airy Mosquito Curtain is machine washable and is custom designed to fit most porch, gazebo or under deck configurations. Curtains are delivered in 2-5 business days and self-installation is quick and easy using only household tools. 

“A front porch is like a pair of outstretched arms inviting visitors into the heart of your home,” says Jordan. “We are able to enjoy our porch so much more during the warm season and still have a good old-fashioned open porch during the cooler months. Mosquito Curtains provide a pleasing sanctuary for friends and family.” 

The Mosquito Curtain is a product of Georgia-based Mosquito Curtains Inc. For more information on the Mosquito Curtain or to place an order, you can visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.



Bond Sales Mosquito Curtains And A Rodeo Ghost.


Kurt Jordan
I should have been content with my coveted Wall Street job as a bond salesman, but after 19 years, I decided to recklessly toss tie to the wind for the life of a small business entrepreneur beckoned by my wife's encouragement and a ghost of the past. Some people are built for institutional bond sales and some are able to fake it for a very long time. I should have realized my lack of calling during the interview process. Towards the end of my first year at graduate business school at Berkeley in the mid-80's, I was looking for a summer job and heard of a class trip to New York to visit the investment banking firms. The tour was an open house where we were able to spend a couple of hours at a half-dozen of the Wall Street firms. I knew practically nothing about "the business" and impulsively went along. I simply listened, watched and imitated.

I noticed that several of the students were snagging business cards from some of the presenters to arrange a later interview. It seemed like the thing to do, so, I asked for a business card from a bond trader named Howard who had presented for Lehman Brothers. That afternoon, I phoned Howard from a phone booth bank at the bottom of the World Trade Center.“

Hello my name is Kurt Jordan. I was at the presentation you gave to the Berkeley Business School and would like to meet with you if you have a moment to see about how I might arrange an interview with your firm.” I marveled at how well my scripted line flowed until I heard a long silence, then a voice answering back, “Ah Jeezis. Who are you?”

“Kurt Jor….”

“Yeah, Jurt. Look, I’ve had a bad day, in fact, I’ve had a bad week. You give me one good reason why I should let you up here. What’s your story?”

My script ran out. I was completely off guard. Everyone interviewing with the investment banks knew what “your story” meant, even me. It was a sort of sales pitch you were supposed to give explaining why Wall Street couldn’t live without you. You had three minutes to demonstrate your ability to earn gobs of money from your accomplishments and communication skills. Somewhere in the monologue you were to explain that you’ve wanted to be “in the business” from the moment you tossed your first newspaper, how you would be willing to live anywhere on the planet, and found it personally fulfilling to work eighty hours a week.

Just as I began stuttering some nonsense, there was a clicking sound coming from the phone’s earpiece and then a computerized voice, “please deposit 60 cents….please deposit 60 cents for….3 minutes.” Never in my wildest imagination would I have ever guessed that it was a toll call to phone from the lobby of the World Trade Center to the 65th floor of the SAME building. As I rifled through my pockets, all I could hear was “Ah Jeezis!” interrupted by clicks and some computerized bitch who was destroying my shot at the big time, until …….dial tone.

Had I any real Street sense, I would have relied on the short attention span of a bond trader and tried again in a day or two with a slightly different intro, but instead, I gathered every bit of loose change I could find and called him right back, “Yes sir, Kurt Jordan, sorry about that….”

He quickly interrupted, “Listen, son. I give you credit for having the "bleeps" to call back after that "bleeping ableeption" of a phone call, but it ain’t gonna happen. You gotta get your story straight. Think about it. I know you’re in there somewhere just find it then call me back, but not before next year.” And in one breath, Howard the trader violated every one of my altar-boy sensibilities while reducing me to rubble.

Eventually, I got my “story” straight and successfully ran the gauntlet of interviews at Salomon Brothers. Before I knew it, I was working with one of the most powerful bond trading teams on Wall Street. My first bonus was a divine sign that I didn't really fit in.

It was a handsome $30k bonus for a 27 year old and more than I deserved. I remember going out on my back deck, master of the universe enjoying the moment while smoking a cigar and sipping on Port wine envisioning my charmed future. The sweet Port attracted some yellow jackets that I slurped into my mouth just as I was daydreaming my kinship with Rockefeller and Vanderbilt. The bees stung me about 12 times as I jumped, danced and kicked like some crazy mosh pit dancer. The next day, I came back to work with a swollen tongue and could barely talk. Of course, I kept my story to myself.

Whether on the desk or attending outside events, I always felt like a square peg in a round hole when it came to the culture of highly determined AAA-type personalities. I felt privileged to work with so many brilliant people, but even the brightest knew deep down that the sand was dripping through the hour glass and chances were good that one day that a fateful tap on the shoulder would come telling them their career has reached a cul-de-sac. And, on Wall Street, you either grow or rot like a dead fish.

When cornering most colleagues in personal discussions, I was surprised at how many like-minded people pined away for something more personally fulfilling. So many talented people, good at their jobs who seemed to resent the huge carrots and scrutinizing perceptions that could strangle a career at any moment. Most, when pulled aside will tell you of a secret desire to do something else, but back on the desk, we bayed at the full moon as was expected. But despite the intensity, no one dares to leave while the golden cow still has pistol-gripped udders.

After four firms and a handful of morally challenging predicaments, I was ripe for the change while I still had my integrity, but; I lacked the courage to actually leave. My wife, Elizabeth encouraged me to pursue a business idea we shared, but leaving the security was terrifying.

One day, while visiting my parents in Redondo Beach, I was rummaging through a box of old photos trying to get a grip on who I really was and where I belonged on this planet. I was surprised to come across a letter dated, 1947, written by a Captain Oliver Orson to my grandmother after the second war. He described how he knew her husband, Sport Jordan, as a civilian oil driller prior to the outbreak of war in the Philippines.

The letter described how the Japanese eventually overran the Philippines and both men were captured together spending three and a half years in prison camp. As the allies retook the Philippines, the Japanese put 1,619 POWs aboard a hell ship named the Oryoku Maru and set sail for Japan under the cover of a typhoon. When the storm cleared, the unmarked ship was repeatedly bombed by allied planes and eventually my grandfather, Sport Jordan, was killed. In his letter, Captain Orson mentioned a fancy silver belt buckle that my grandfather hid from the Japanese for 3 1/2 years in prison camp. A Lt. Scott took possession of the buckle upon his death and promised to return it to the family.

The letter was an excellent template for which to research the experience of my grandfather, complete with dates and locations. Before long, I was deep into a research community of relatives searching for answers.

I asked my father about the belt buckle and what he remembered of his dad. My father described the depression as the happiest childhood a boy could have. Sure he ate frogs and beans but he adds, “Think about it. You’re ten years old, your dad isn’t working and you both spend the day together on adventurous food gathering expeditions. What could be better than that? ”

“Your grandfather was a dreamer and an optimist” my father wistfully said. “He had two adages, “Worry about today and let tomorrow worry about itself. And, there’s no such thing as courage without fear.” When things hit rock bottom, as they often did, dad could smile like a millionaire. We belonged to the richest family in the world.”

Sport Jordan was a horseman and rode in amateur rodeos. On one occasion, he won the bronc riding contest and the silver rodeo belt buckle he later protected as a POW. It was one of the last times father and son would ever see each other again. Sport Jordan finally landed a dream job drilling oil wells in the Philippines in 1941, a job that would deliver his family from the hardships of The Depression. Little did anyone realize that he was headed into the teeth of a Japanese juggernaut.


mosquito
Depression kids
Jordan Kids


With Oil Crew (lower left)


Sport Jordan (right)
I was embarrassed by my own self-pity at my unbearable predicament as a tortured bond salesman suffering through expensive client dinners above the dignity of doggie bags. I listened to my father’s heart felt story that he was revealing to me for the first time and soaked in every word.

My father knew practically nothing of his father’s war experience. As a combat soldier himself in Korea, he seemed to avoid any subject of war altogether and I never pressed. But, I became obsessed with finding answers. I poured through unpublished manuscripts, diaries, spoke to POWs over the phone and learned exactly the details of my grandfather’s experience. He was a Silver Star recipient that he earned as a blockade runner operating a supply ship through enemy waters (a fascinating story in itself).

When placed aboard the hell ship, the men were crammed into the sweltering holds of the ship with water and food measured in tablespoons. Conditions were so horrific that one night some of the men killed others (40) in a desperate crazed melee to literally drink life from their victims. Slowly, through my research, I pieced together my grandfather’s story. I wrote a screenplay, and in the process learned the essence of my grandfather as I added dialogue to my story. He seemed to come alive revealing himself through my typing fingers as if I held a Ouiji board.

The resounding message he told haunted me. “You worry too much. Time to be a man. Follow your dreams and be a slave to no one, especially to yourself.” I felt I had to find the belt buckle as it was somehow the physical key to my salvation, but who and where was Lt. Scott? One day, I received an email from a fellow researcher who had located the ship's roster, “Kurt, there were only Four Scotts on the Oryoku that were Lt’s at the time. Only one survived. His name is Walter Scott from Grand Rapids, MI. p.s. Good luck.

Patio screen
Oryoku Maru


Post card sent home

Patio screen
Enaura Maru

I desperately phoned every Walter Scott in Grand Rapids to no avail. I expanded my search to all of Michigan hoping a nephew was named after him or perhaps he moved to a retirement community. One Walter Scott I contacted was a retired police detective and curiously asked, “Son, what are you up to?” I told him my story and he offered to help me find Lt. Walter Scott.

A week later he faxed me a list of American Legion phone numbers and instructed me to call and ask them to check old rosters while he followed up on other leads. Little did I realize that when you call an American Legion, often you are calling a bar. But, on about my 4th Legion, I heard the bartender yell out, “Anyone know Walter Scott? “

In the background I heard a voice, “Scotty? Yeah, I knew, Scotty. What about him?”

“Some guy on the phone looking for him.”

Unfortunately, Walter Scott had passed, but the man knew his daughter and I found her phone number. As I dialed, I rehearsed my wild request about as well as I had for Howard the banker, “Gee you don’t know me but my grandfather was a POW with your father….say, do you know anything about a silver rodeo belt buckle? And in that split second....... I dreamed I could give it to my father and the rodeo belt buckle would somehow heal us both.

To my disappointment, she knew of no fancy silver belt buckle. Walter Scott, in desperation, even traded his wedding ring with the Japanese for mats to keep warm as they sailed north into the chilling Japanese waters. Chances were that the buckle was on some Japanese mantle piece as a captured war relic.

I reported the news to my Dad who had shared so much about his father and helped me bring Sport Jordan’s magic back to life. And then, the epiphany hit me. While the facts may differ, the truth is that I did find the belt buckle and I did give it to my father through the countless conversations and revelations we both shared.

Corny as it may sound, I quit my job and embarked on the idea my wife and I developed for an alternative to porch screening. I finally chased that blue-collared spirit but still had those white-collared bills. I traded my Bloomberg for a laptop and sewing machine and we started www.MosquitoCurtains.com with a snappy slogan “The elegant, yet inexpensive, removable alternative to porch screening.”

I went from the big trades to becoming web designer, gorilla marketer, and even Mottel the tailor at times. Occasionally I will go out locally to visit a client. It is an unusual feeling to hear, “Honey, the mosquito curtain guy is here,” as if I were outranked by the plumber. Fortunately, I am viewing humility as a new challenge to my personal growth.

There is something to be said about pointing to a physical product with your wife and proudly saying, “We made that,” rather than staring to a stack of trade tickets with a cocked head trying to rationalize how you contribute to society by facilitating market liquidity.

Occasionally, I get a call from a client who is “in the bond business” and we talk a little shop. Those calls always seem to translate into sales as the rapport has been well-rehearsed.

As difficult as small business is though, I am forever pleased to have muscled through the fear to rally enough courage to listen to my wife and grandfather and live for today and let tomorrow worry about itself. Never once have I looked back and regretted my decision. I am a round peg in a round hole now and it feels great. The grass may not be greener but now it’s my lawn. Every day, I still think about my rodeo ghost, listen for guidance, and occasionally search for his fancy silver rodeo belt buckle that he must have saved for me.

Fathers Sons & A Rodeo Ghost by Kurt Jordan


Download Mosquito Curtain Installation GuideDownload Screenplay (188Kb)

 

Lt Walter Scott Audio - The Man who buried Sport Jordan and fought on Corregidor



Kurt Jordan
I should have been content with my coveted Wall Street job as a bond salesman, but after 19 years, I decided to recklessly toss tie to the wind for the life of a small business entrepreneur beckoned by my wife's encouragement and a ghost of the past. Some people are built for institutional bond sales and some are able to fake it for a very long time. I should have realized my lack of calling during the interview process. Towards the end of my first year at graduate business school at Berkeley in the mid-80's, I was looking for a summer job and heard of a class trip to New York to visit the investment banking firms. The tour was an open house where we were able to spend a couple of hours at a half-dozen of the Wall Street firms. I knew practically nothing about "the business" and impulsively went along. I simply listened, watched and imitated.

I noticed that several of the students were snagging business cards from some of the presenters to arrange a later interview. It seemed like the thing to do, so, I asked for a business card from a bond trader named Howard who had presented for Lehman Brothers. That afternoon, I phoned Howard from a phone booth bank at the bottom of the World Trade Center.“

Hello my name is Kurt Jordan. I was at the presentation you gave to the Berkeley Business School and would like to meet with you if you have a moment to see about how I might arrange an interview with your firm.” I marveled at how well my scripted line flowed until I heard a long silence, then a voice answering back, “Ah Jeezis. Who are you?”

“Kurt Jor….”

“Yeah, Jurt. Look, I’ve had a bad day, in fact, I’ve had a bad week. You give me one good reason why I should let you up here. What’s your story?”

My script ran out. I was completely off guard. Everyone interviewing with the investment banks knew what “your story” meant, even me. It was a sort of sales pitch you were supposed to give explaining why Wall Street couldn’t live without you. You had three minutes to demonstrate your ability to earn gobs of money from your accomplishments and communication skills. Somewhere in the monologue you were to explain that you’ve wanted to be “in the business” from the moment you tossed your first newspaper, how you would be willing to live anywhere on the planet, and found it personally fulfilling to work eighty hours a week.

Just as I began stuttering some nonsense, there was a clicking sound coming from the phone’s earpiece and then a computerized voice, “please deposit 60 cents….please deposit 60 cents for….3 minutes.” Never in my wildest imagination would I have ever guessed that it was a toll call to phone from the lobby of the World Trade Center to the 65th floor of the SAME building. As I rifled through my pockets, all I could hear was “Ah Jeezis!” interrupted by clicks and some computerized bitch who was destroying my shot at the big time, until …….dial tone.

Had I any real Street sense, I would have relied on the short attention span of a bond trader and tried again in a day or two with a slightly different intro, but instead, I gathered every bit of loose change I could find and called him right back, “Yes sir, Kurt Jordan, sorry about that….”

He quickly interrupted, “Listen, son. I give you credit for having the "bleeps" to call back after that "bleeping ableeption" of a phone call, but it ain’t gonna happen. You gotta get your story straight. Think about it. I know you’re in there somewhere just find it then call me back, but not before next year.” And in one breath, Howard the trader violated every one of my altar-boy sensibilities while reducing me to rubble.

Eventually, I got my “story” straight and successfully ran the gauntlet of interviews at Salomon Brothers. Before I knew it, I was working with one of the most powerful bond trading teams on Wall Street. My first bonus was a divine sign that I didn't really fit in.

It was a handsome $30k bonus for a 27 year old and more than I deserved. I remember going out on my back deck, master of the universe enjoying the moment while smoking a cigar and sipping on Port wine envisioning my charmed future. The sweet Port attracted some yellow jackets that I slurped into my mouth just as I was daydreaming my kinship with Rockefeller and Vanderbilt. The bees stung me about 12 times as I jumped, danced and kicked like some crazy mosh pit dancer. The next day, I came back to work with a swollen tongue and could barely talk. Of course, I kept my story to myself.

Whether on the desk or attending outside events, I always felt like a square peg in a round hole when it came to the culture of highly determined AAA-type personalities. I felt privileged to work with so many brilliant people, but even the brightest knew deep down that the sand was dripping through the hour glass and chances were good that one day that a fateful tap on the shoulder would come telling them their career has reached a cul-de-sac. And, on Wall Street, you either grow or rot like a dead fish.

When cornering most colleagues in personal discussions, I was surprised at how many like-minded people pined away for something more personally fulfilling. So many talented people, good at their jobs who seemed to resent the huge carrots and scrutinizing perceptions that could strangle a career at any moment. Most, when pulled aside will tell you of a secret desire to do something else, but back on the desk, we bayed at the full moon as was expected. But despite the intensity, no one dares to leave while the golden cow still has pistol-gripped udders.

After four firms and a handful of morally challenging predicaments, I was ripe for the change while I still had my integrity, but; I lacked the courage to actually leave. My wife, Elizabeth encouraged me to pursue a business idea we shared, but leaving the security was terrifying.

One day, while visiting my parents in Redondo Beach, I was rummaging through a box of old photos trying to get a grip on who I really was and where I belonged on this planet. I was surprised to come across a letter dated, 1947, written by a Captain Oliver Orson to my grandmother after the second war. He described how he knew her husband, Sport Jordan, as a civilian oil driller prior to the outbreak of war in the Philippines.

The letter described how the Japanese eventually overran the Philippines and both men were captured together spending three and a half years in prison camp. As the allies retook the Philippines, the Japanese put 1,619 POWs aboard a hell ship named the Oryoku Maru and set sail for Japan under the cover of a typhoon. When the storm cleared, the unmarked ship was repeatedly bombed by allied planes and eventually my grandfather, Sport Jordan, was killed. In his letter, Captain Orson mentioned a fancy silver belt buckle that my grandfather hid from the Japanese for 3 1/2 years in prison camp. A Lt. Scott took possession of the buckle upon his death and promised to return it to the family.

The letter was an excellent template for which to research the experience of my grandfather, complete with dates and locations. Before long, I was deep into a research community of relatives searching for answers.

I asked my father about the belt buckle and what he remembered of his dad. My father described the depression as the happiest childhood a boy could have. Sure he ate frogs and beans but he adds, “Think about it. You’re ten years old, your dad isn’t working and you both spend the day together on adventurous food gathering expeditions. What could be better than that? ”

“Your grandfather was a dreamer and an optimist” my father wistfully said. “He had two adages, “Worry about today and let tomorrow worry about itself. And, there’s no such thing as courage without fear.” When things hit rock bottom, as they often did, dad could smile like a millionaire. We belonged to the richest family in the world.”

Sport Jordan was a horseman and rode in amateur rodeos. On one occasion, he won the bronc riding contest and the silver rodeo belt buckle he later protected as a POW. It was one of the last times father and son would ever see each other again. Sport Jordan finally landed a dream job drilling oil wells in the Philippines in 1941, a job that would deliver his family from the hardships of The Depression. Little did anyone realize that he was headed into the teeth of a Japanese juggernaut.


mosquito
Depression kids
Jordan Kids


With Oil Crew (lower left)


Sport Jordan (right)
I was embarrassed by my own self-pity at my unbearable predicament as a tortured bond salesman suffering through expensive client dinners above the dignity of doggie bags. I listened to my father’s heart felt story that he was revealing to me for the first time and soaked in every word.

My father knew practically nothing of his father’s war experience. As a combat soldier himself in Korea, he seemed to avoid any subject of war altogether and I never pressed. But, I became obsessed with finding answers. I poured through unpublished manuscripts, diaries, spoke to POWs over the phone and learned exactly the details of my grandfather’s experience. He was a Silver Star recipient that he earned as a blockade runner operating a supply ship through enemy waters (a fascinating story in itself).

When placed aboard the hell ship, the men were crammed into the sweltering holds of the ship with water and food measured in tablespoons. Conditions were so horrific that one night some of the men killed others (40) in a desperate crazed melee to literally drink life from their victims. Slowly, through my research, I pieced together my grandfather’s story. I wrote a screenplay, and in the process learned the essence of my grandfather as I added dialogue to my story. He seemed to come alive revealing himself through my typing fingers as if I held a Ouiji board.

The resounding message he told haunted me. “You worry too much. Time to be a man. Follow your dreams and be a slave to no one, especially to yourself.” I felt I had to find the belt buckle as it was somehow the physical key to my salvation, but who and where was Lt. Scott? One day, I received an email from a fellow researcher who had located the ship's roster, “Kurt, there were only Four Scotts on the Oryoku that were Lt’s at the time. Only one survived. His name is Walter Scott from Grand Rapids, MI. p.s. Good luck.

Patio screen
Oryoku Maru


Post card sent home

Patio screen
Enaura Maru

I desperately phoned every Walter Scott in Grand Rapids to no avail. I expanded my search to all of Michigan hoping a nephew was named after him or perhaps he moved to a retirement community. One Walter Scott I contacted was a retired police detective and curiously asked, “Son, what are you up to?” I told him my story and he offered to help me find Lt. Walter Scott.

A week later he faxed me a list of American Legion phone numbers and instructed me to call and ask them to check old rosters while he followed up on other leads. Little did I realize that when you call an American Legion, often you are calling a bar. But, on about my 4th Legion, I heard the bartender yell out, “Anyone know Walter Scott? “

In the background I heard a voice, “Scotty? Yeah, I knew, Scotty. What about him?”

“Some guy on the phone looking for him.”

Unfortunately, Walter Scott had passed, but the man knew his daughter and I found her phone number. As I dialed, I rehearsed my wild request about as well as I had for Howard the banker, “Gee you don’t know me but my grandfather was a POW with your father….say, do you know anything about a silver rodeo belt buckle? And in that split second....... I dreamed I could give it to my father and the rodeo belt buckle would somehow heal us both.

To my disappointment, she knew of no fancy silver belt buckle. Walter Scott, in desperation, even traded his wedding ring with the Japanese for mats to keep warm as they sailed north into the chilling Japanese waters. Chances were that the buckle was on some Japanese mantle piece as a captured war relic.

I reported the news to my Dad who had shared so much about his father and helped me bring Sport Jordan’s magic back to life. And then, the epiphany hit me. While the facts may differ, the truth is that I did find the belt buckle and I did give it to my father through the countless conversations and revelations we both shared.

Corny as it may sound, I quit my job and embarked on the idea my wife and I developed for an alternative to porch screening. I finally chased that blue-collared spirit but still had those white-collared bills. I traded my Bloomberg for a laptop and sewing machine and we started www.MosquitoCurtains.com with a snappy slogan “The elegant, yet inexpensive, removable alternative to porch screening.”

I went from the big trades to becoming web designer, gorilla marketer, and even Mottel the tailor at times. Occasionally I will go out locally to visit a client. It is an unusual feeling to hear, “Honey, the mosquito curtain guy is here,” as if I were outranked by the plumber. Fortunately, I am viewing humility as a new challenge to my personal growth.

There is something to be said about pointing to a physical product with your wife and proudly saying, “We made that,” rather than staring to a stack of trade tickets with a cocked head trying to rationalize how you contribute to society by facilitating market liquidity.

Occasionally, I get a call from a client who is “in the bond business” and we talk a little shop. Those calls always seem to translate into sales as the rapport has been well-rehearsed.

As difficult as small business is though, I am forever pleased to have muscled through the fear to rally enough courage to listen to my wife and grandfather and live for today and let tomorrow worry about itself. Never once have I looked back and regretted my decision. I am a round peg in a round hole now and it feels great. The grass may not be greener but now it’s my lawn. Every day, I still think about my rodeo ghost, listen for guidance, and occasionally search for his fancy silver rodeo belt buckle that he must have saved for me.

Fathers Sons & A Rodeo Ghost by Kurt Jordan


Download Mosquito Curtain Installation GuideDownload Screenplay (188Kb)

 

Lt Walter Scott Audio - The Man who buried Sport Jordan and fought on Corregidor





Finally, A New Storm Proof Screening?

mosquito netting
Larelle House
St. Petersburg, FL


permanent screening




outdoor curtains
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: As the storm season has finally passed, many Floridians are reluctant to spend thousands of dollars replacing screen enclosures that have taken a pounding. In the attempt to regain normalcy, many are finding it difficult to find professionals to replace damaged screens as contractors focus on, the more lucrative, new installations. Frustrated, many home owners are turning to Mosquito Curtains as an alternative to permanent screening.

Mosquito Curtains were developed as an elegant, yet inexpensive, alternative to permanent patio screening. Originally marketed to northern upscale homes, the curtains compliment porches with unique architectural designs while enabling users to seasonally enjoy a good old-fashioned “open porch.”

During the early years, we found that because Floridians endured a longer insect season, they opted for more permanent solutions.” Says Kurt Jordan of Mosquito Curtains Inc., “Now, we are receiving desperate calls from people frustrated with the unusual hurricane cycle and a long contractor’s queue.” The curtains are custom-made to fit most porch configurations with seamless material in both mosquito and no-see-um meshes. The Curtains are delivered in 2-5 business days and self-installation is quick and easy using only household tools. More importantly, when the next big storm gets named, the curtain is removed in minutes to avoid damage.

The outdoor curtains provide for several attachment methods including Velcro® tape , hooks and a sleek aluminum tracking system used for hospital privacy curtains. A typical 40’ x 10’ curtain costs $320 and with optional tracking, an additional $150.

The durable, knitted and heat-cured polyester is easy to care for and comes in three neutrals: white, ivory and black. The airy Mosquito Curtain is machine washable and is custom designed to fit most porch, gazebo or under deck configurations. Because the curtains are easily cleaned, a white color, that reflects radiant sunlight, is practical. Jordan adds, “The favorite coastal product is our jet-black no-see-um fabric that is so gorgeous you just want to swim in it. Unlike many no-see-um meshes, it is incredibly durable, has 85% visibility, and allows for better air flow.”

The company’s website, www.mosquitocurtains.com has shipped more than 29,000 orders to customers in the United States and abroad. Mosquito Curtains appeal to both owners of upscale residences who appreciate its pleasing aesthetics, and budgeted home owners who appreciate an 80% cost savings compared to a professionally installed framed screen.

The Mosquito Curtain is a product of Georgia-based Mosquito Curtains Inc. For more information on the Mosquito Curtain or to place an order, you can visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.


mosquito netting
Larelle House
St. Petersburg, FL


permanent screening




outdoor curtains
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: As the storm season has finally passed, many Floridians are reluctant to spend thousands of dollars replacing screen enclosures that have taken a pounding. In the attempt to regain normalcy, many are finding it difficult to find professionals to replace damaged screens as contractors focus on, the more lucrative, new installations. Frustrated, many home owners are turning to Mosquito Curtains as an alternative to permanent screening.

Mosquito Curtains were developed as an elegant, yet inexpensive, alternative to permanent patio screening. Originally marketed to northern upscale homes, the curtains compliment porches with unique architectural designs while enabling users to seasonally enjoy a good old-fashioned “open porch.”

During the early years, we found that because Floridians endured a longer insect season, they opted for more permanent solutions.” Says Kurt Jordan of Mosquito Curtains Inc., “Now, we are receiving desperate calls from people frustrated with the unusual hurricane cycle and a long contractor’s queue.” The curtains are custom-made to fit most porch configurations with seamless material in both mosquito and no-see-um meshes. The Curtains are delivered in 2-5 business days and self-installation is quick and easy using only household tools. More importantly, when the next big storm gets named, the curtain is removed in minutes to avoid damage.

The outdoor curtains provide for several attachment methods including Velcro® tape , hooks and a sleek aluminum tracking system used for hospital privacy curtains. A typical 40’ x 10’ curtain costs $320 and with optional tracking, an additional $150.

The durable, knitted and heat-cured polyester is easy to care for and comes in three neutrals: white, ivory and black. The airy Mosquito Curtain is machine washable and is custom designed to fit most porch, gazebo or under deck configurations. Because the curtains are easily cleaned, a white color, that reflects radiant sunlight, is practical. Jordan adds, “The favorite coastal product is our jet-black no-see-um fabric that is so gorgeous you just want to swim in it. Unlike many no-see-um meshes, it is incredibly durable, has 85% visibility, and allows for better air flow.”

The company’s website, www.mosquitocurtains.com has shipped more than 29,000 orders to customers in the United States and abroad. Mosquito Curtains appeal to both owners of upscale residences who appreciate its pleasing aesthetics, and budgeted home owners who appreciate an 80% cost savings compared to a professionally installed framed screen.

The Mosquito Curtain is a product of Georgia-based Mosquito Curtains Inc. For more information on the Mosquito Curtain or to place an order, you can visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.





Why Do Mosquitoes Seem More Intense In Northern Climates?

mosquito netting

When you think of mosquitoes, you typically think of warm muggy climates common in southern states.  But ask anyone north of Ohio and they will describe concentrated swarms of mosquitoes that would send even Lewis & Clark indoors.
If you've ever heard that whirring high pitched whine of a mosquito, you know just how aggrevating they can be. Many of our clients claimed that they lived in the mosquito capital of the world... so we did a little research.

Mosquito Curtains Inc. makes mosquito netting curtains as alternative to permanent screen porch enclosures. The owner says, "We were surprised to find that sales were highest in northern states." Based in Atlanta, we thought we lived in Mosquito-land, yet more than a half dozen northern states and Canada claim the mosquito as their state bird. Owner, Kurt Jordan, searched for answers, "Sure there are factors such as architectural style, lifestyle, and potential snow damage to permanent screening; however, the intensity of mosquito concentrations in the north prompted us to speak to a few entomologists.”

Female mosquitoes drink blood because it contains certain proteins that enable it to lay eggs. They are attracted to their hosts by light colors, body heat, humidity released during perspiration, and carbon dioxide. While there are other chemical factors, the tastiest victims seem to be those with higher metabolisms or those exerting themselves outdoors. Stand outside with a rake in your hand stimulating your metabolism and you wear a neon sign that says, “Dinner here.”

When the days shorten and temperatures drop, adult females and their larvae are able to enter a low metabolism stage called diapause. During this phase, a gene switches the mosquito diet from blood to fats and sugars. Mosquitoes in diapause will live in tree holes, basements, and many survive the winter in semi-hibernation. Eggs will immediately become dormant and await the warmer season to develop. If conditions are just so, larvae will enter diapause sooner than the egg laying females and dormant eggs will accumulate. And then comes the spring when mosquitoes awake from their winter sleep. Snow melt provides prolonged saturation ideal for breeding. Eggs that have accumulated during the fall season begin to hatch. Invertebrate predators of the mosquito won’t awake for another month, and the first weeks of spring become the high season for mosquito nursery rhymes, free love and few predators to send them to mosquito heaven. If you think that mosquitoes are killed by extreme temperatures, think again. Mosquito species even live in Antarctica, though hibernate 11 months of the year. 

“Southern States have a longer persistent season,” says Jordan. “The architecture and lifestyle has made permanent screening a more common norm. Northerners take their short warm seasons more seriously and enjoy the outdoors while they can. Architecture in the north seems to place more emphasis on the character of the porch over protection for a relatively short season and a removable screen enclosure seems to just fit."

Execution by Mosquito

According to Jerry Hogsette, leading mosquito entomologist at the USDA, "Many years ago in Alaska, a cruel form of execution was to strip a man naked and send him down the Yukon River in a canoe. The mosquitoes were so thick, death generally occurred by suffocation. If that didn't kill the poor guy, he would die of blood loss or desanguination.

 

screen porch

Mosquito Netting Curtains

Nothing is more effective than a physical barrier to separate you from mosquitoes. Mosquito curtains are a removable and washable alternative to permanent screening. Originally designed for upscale homes, they are elegant and attractive, yet are much more affordable than traditional screening. Mosquito Curtains are offered in various colors such as White, Ivory, and Black as well as a “no-see-um” mesh for coastal sand flies. A typical 40ft. porch cost $320 and may be hung using a variety of attachment methods including curtain tracking similar to what is used for hospital privacy curtains.
mosquito netting

When you think of mosquitoes, you typically think of warm muggy climates common in southern states.  But ask anyone north of Ohio and they will describe concentrated swarms of mosquitoes that would send even Lewis & Clark indoors.
If you've ever heard that whirring high pitched whine of a mosquito, you know just how aggrevating they can be. Many of our clients claimed that they lived in the mosquito capital of the world... so we did a little research.

Mosquito Curtains Inc. makes mosquito netting curtains as alternative to permanent screen porch enclosures. The owner says, "We were surprised to find that sales were highest in northern states." Based in Atlanta, we thought we lived in Mosquito-land, yet more than a half dozen northern states and Canada claim the mosquito as their state bird. Owner, Kurt Jordan, searched for answers, "Sure there are factors such as architectural style, lifestyle, and potential snow damage to permanent screening; however, the intensity of mosquito concentrations in the north prompted us to speak to a few entomologists.”

Female mosquitoes drink blood because it contains certain proteins that enable it to lay eggs. They are attracted to their hosts by light colors, body heat, humidity released during perspiration, and carbon dioxide. While there are other chemical factors, the tastiest victims seem to be those with higher metabolisms or those exerting themselves outdoors. Stand outside with a rake in your hand stimulating your metabolism and you wear a neon sign that says, “Dinner here.”

When the days shorten and temperatures drop, adult females and their larvae are able to enter a low metabolism stage called diapause. During this phase, a gene switches the mosquito diet from blood to fats and sugars. Mosquitoes in diapause will live in tree holes, basements, and many survive the winter in semi-hibernation. Eggs will immediately become dormant and await the warmer season to develop. If conditions are just so, larvae will enter diapause sooner than the egg laying females and dormant eggs will accumulate. And then comes the spring when mosquitoes awake from their winter sleep. Snow melt provides prolonged saturation ideal for breeding. Eggs that have accumulated during the fall season begin to hatch. Invertebrate predators of the mosquito won’t awake for another month, and the first weeks of spring become the high season for mosquito nursery rhymes, free love and few predators to send them to mosquito heaven. If you think that mosquitoes are killed by extreme temperatures, think again. Mosquito species even live in Antarctica, though hibernate 11 months of the year. 

“Southern States have a longer persistent season,” says Jordan. “The architecture and lifestyle has made permanent screening a more common norm. Northerners take their short warm seasons more seriously and enjoy the outdoors while they can. Architecture in the north seems to place more emphasis on the character of the porch over protection for a relatively short season and a removable screen enclosure seems to just fit."

Execution by Mosquito

According to Jerry Hogsette, leading mosquito entomologist at the USDA, "Many years ago in Alaska, a cruel form of execution was to strip a man naked and send him down the Yukon River in a canoe. The mosquitoes were so thick, death generally occurred by suffocation. If that didn't kill the poor guy, he would die of blood loss or desanguination.

 

screen porch

Mosquito Netting Curtains

Nothing is more effective than a physical barrier to separate you from mosquitoes. Mosquito curtains are a removable and washable alternative to permanent screening. Originally designed for upscale homes, they are elegant and attractive, yet are much more affordable than traditional screening. Mosquito Curtains are offered in various colors such as White, Ivory, and Black as well as a “no-see-um” mesh for coastal sand flies. A typical 40ft. porch cost $320 and may be hung using a variety of attachment methods including curtain tracking similar to what is used for hospital privacy curtains.



Air Lines Explore Screen Doors On Aircraft.

A little known fact to many fliers is that certain countries require that aircraft cabins be sprayed with pesticides between flights.  Most of the time the spraying is done just prior to boarding, however don’t be surprised if a flight attendant walks down the aisle waving a can of aerosol while you are already seated.  While the airlines make every effort to use safe products, patrons and crews understandably bristle at the thought of pesticide exposure and health officials are looking for an alternative solution.   

When the aircraft is cleaned and restocked, service doors are left open for access.  Many countries are concerned about the spread of mosquito borne diseases and rightly so.  Mosquitoes are natures deadliest animal to humans claiming more than one million lives annually with such maladies as Malaria, Dengue Fever, Chikungunya, and now West Nile.  But pesticides aren’t 100% effective and flight crews face health risks to repeated exposure in a confined space.

Health advocates for the American flight attendants union, have been working on an alternative solution to screen service doors currently being tested by the USDA.  Mosquito Curtains Inc. (MCI) was chosen to devise a prototype that can accommodate a convex door frame, permit easy entry, and can be easily stowed.  If testing is approved, the union will lobby “at risk” countries to adopt the curtains as an alternative to spraying. 

Kurt Jordan from MCI adds, “In addition to a healthier cabin environment, we anticipate saving the airlines a substantial amount of money from lost work, medical costs and passenger complaints.  We’re only sorry we couldn’t get that familiar screen door squeak and slam sound I remember so well as a child.”

For more information, visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.



A little known fact to many fliers is that certain countries require that aircraft cabins be sprayed with pesticides between flights.  Most of the time the spraying is done just prior to boarding, however don’t be surprised if a flight attendant walks down the aisle waving a can of aerosol while you are already seated.  While the airlines make every effort to use safe products, patrons and crews understandably bristle at the thought of pesticide exposure and health officials are looking for an alternative solution.   

When the aircraft is cleaned and restocked, service doors are left open for access.  Many countries are concerned about the spread of mosquito borne diseases and rightly so.  Mosquitoes are natures deadliest animal to humans claiming more than one million lives annually with such maladies as Malaria, Dengue Fever, Chikungunya, and now West Nile.  But pesticides aren’t 100% effective and flight crews face health risks to repeated exposure in a confined space.

Health advocates for the American flight attendants union, have been working on an alternative solution to screen service doors currently being tested by the USDA.  Mosquito Curtains Inc. (MCI) was chosen to devise a prototype that can accommodate a convex door frame, permit easy entry, and can be easily stowed.  If testing is approved, the union will lobby “at risk” countries to adopt the curtains as an alternative to spraying. 

Kurt Jordan from MCI adds, “In addition to a healthier cabin environment, we anticipate saving the airlines a substantial amount of money from lost work, medical costs and passenger complaints.  We’re only sorry we couldn’t get that familiar screen door squeak and slam sound I remember so well as a child.”

For more information, visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.






A New Mulligan Blocker For Golf Course Residents.

screened patio

screened room

screened room
“I live on the 17th fairway of an Ohio country club and am tired of replacing my torn porch screening every other season because of errant golfers. I’d rip the whole thing out, but then, golf balls would be bouncing off my family and through the windows of my home. Sound familiar? Golf course residents that have paid handsomely for that front row view often find themselves one “Slice” away from damage or danger.

"We never anticipated that we would receive such a consistent stream of calls for this particular problem,” says Kurt Jordan, owner of Atlanta-based Mosquito Curtains Inc. “The phone calls we receive all seem to resonate with the same frustration. The problem with traditional screening is that it is stretched taut over framing. When hit with a golf ball it either dents or tears. Mosquito curtains hang from the ceiling and tend to absorb golf balls like batting a baseball into a sheet hanging on a clothes line. We tested our various netting meshes and found that both our "double-thread-weight" mosquito mesh and our “no-see-um” mesh are perfect for the job."

Made of 100% polyester, the material has over 800 holes per square inch and is “so beautiful, you just want to swim in it,” says Jordan. Surprisingly strong and flexible, the black no-see-um mesh curtains are very transparent with about 85% visibility.

No-see-um curtains can be attached to the ceiling using Velcro®, tape hooks, or optional curtain tracking (as used for hospital privacy curtains). The custom-made curtains are seamless, removable and washable in a standard washing machine. Designed for upscale homes, the curtains are actually much less expensive than permanent screening.

The cost of a typical 10'H x 40'L is about $340 and an additional $160 with the tracking option. Mosquito Curtains come with a complete attachment kit and easily self-installs in less than 2 hours. “That’s even less expensive than having someone replace an existing screen,” says Jordan.

Homeowner’s associations are warming up to the idea of non-permanent screening. Many find the curtains to be more elegant and decorative as traditional screening is sometimes considered unattractive to certain genres of architecture. In some cases, covenants only will only permit these removable systems.

For more information, visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.

screened patio

screened room

screened room
“I live on the 17th fairway of an Ohio country club and am tired of replacing my torn porch screening every other season because of errant golfers. I’d rip the whole thing out, but then, golf balls would be bouncing off my family and through the windows of my home. Sound familiar? Golf course residents that have paid handsomely for that front row view often find themselves one “Slice” away from damage or danger.

"We never anticipated that we would receive such a consistent stream of calls for this particular problem,” says Kurt Jordan, owner of Atlanta-based Mosquito Curtains Inc. “The phone calls we receive all seem to resonate with the same frustration. The problem with traditional screening is that it is stretched taut over framing. When hit with a golf ball it either dents or tears. Mosquito curtains hang from the ceiling and tend to absorb golf balls like batting a baseball into a sheet hanging on a clothes line. We tested our various netting meshes and found that both our "double-thread-weight" mosquito mesh and our “no-see-um” mesh are perfect for the job."

Made of 100% polyester, the material has over 800 holes per square inch and is “so beautiful, you just want to swim in it,” says Jordan. Surprisingly strong and flexible, the black no-see-um mesh curtains are very transparent with about 85% visibility.

No-see-um curtains can be attached to the ceiling using Velcro®, tape hooks, or optional curtain tracking (as used for hospital privacy curtains). The custom-made curtains are seamless, removable and washable in a standard washing machine. Designed for upscale homes, the curtains are actually much less expensive than permanent screening.

The cost of a typical 10'H x 40'L is about $340 and an additional $160 with the tracking option. Mosquito Curtains come with a complete attachment kit and easily self-installs in less than 2 hours. “That’s even less expensive than having someone replace an existing screen,” says Jordan.

Homeowner’s associations are warming up to the idea of non-permanent screening. Many find the curtains to be more elegant and decorative as traditional screening is sometimes considered unattractive to certain genres of architecture. In some cases, covenants only will only permit these removable systems.

For more information, visit www.mosquitocurtains.com or call 770-645-4745.




A Summary Of Mosquito Protection Ideas.

mosquito netting



screen porch



camper screen



mosquito tent



screened deck room
A front porch is like a warm embrace inviting visitors into the heart of the home. It is where we share a balmy evening dinner with friends, where a porch swing beckons a first kiss, or where a boy might share his sad day with a puppy. However, the peace is shattered when we hear that familiar high-pitched buzz of persistent mosquitoes. We’ve spent so much effort adorning our lovely open porches and when we refuse the eye-sore of permanent screening, we ask, “What else can we do to protect ourselves from the nasty blood suckers that hunt us?

A temperate winter has not produced the sustained cold that seasonally reduces mosquito populations. This year might prove to be a very bad year for these disease carrying micro-monsters. Mosquito control has become big business offering products with varying degrees of effectiveness. People will try just about anything short of napalm for relief and we would like to share a few alternatives you can use to protect your family.

Mosquito Curtains

Nothing is more effective than a physical barrier to separate you from mosquitoes. Mosquito curtains are a removable and washable alternative to permanent screening. Originally designed for upscale homes, they are elegant and attractive, yet are much more affordable than traditional screening.

Mosquito Curtains are offered in various colors such as White, Ivory, and Black as well as a “no-see-um” mesh for coastal sand flies. A typical 40ft. porch cost $720 and may be hung using a variety of attachment methods including curtain tracking similar to what is used for hospital privacy curtains.

Home-made Remedies


Our favorite home-made remedy is a very simple and inexpensive “plate trap.” Fill a white dinner plate with water and a few drops of lemon scented dishwashing soap. Set a few traps outside and count your dead. The mosquitoes are attracted to both the white color and lemon scent. As they land to lay their eggs they get stuck in the soapy emulsion and cannot escape. In an informal field test, five of these plate traps killed as many mosquitoes as an expensive one-acre propane trap for a fraction of a penny.

Propane Traps

Propane traps kill mosquitoes. However, at an initial price tag of $400 and $30 per month for propane and lure replacements, they can be costly and a hassle to operate. Often they attract mosquitoes from a broader area than you wish to control. And while your neighbors will appreciate your good deeds, mosquito populations may not be reduced as quickly as you might hope.

Mosquito Misting Systems

Mosquito misting systems are certainly the new rage among upscale homes that can afford the relatively high installation and maintenance cost. A word of caution though as some manufacturers have come under scrutiny for misleading advertising claiming that the chemicals are completely safe. While the headline insecticide may be harmless, it is sometimes supplemented with dangerous ingredients. One need only read the WARNING label to assess the dangers of this system.

mosquito netting



screen porch



camper screen



mosquito tent



screened deck room
A front porch is like a warm embrace inviting visitors into the heart of the home. It is where we share a balmy evening dinner with friends, where a porch swing beckons a first kiss, or where a boy might share his sad day with a puppy. However, the peace is shattered when we hear that familiar high-pitched buzz of persistent mosquitoes. We’ve spent so much effort adorning our lovely open porches and when we refuse the eye-sore of permanent screening, we ask, “What else can we do to protect ourselves from the nasty blood suckers that hunt us?

A temperate winter has not produced the sustained cold that seasonally reduces mosquito populations. This year might prove to be a very bad year for these disease carrying micro-monsters. Mosquito control has become big business offering products with varying degrees of effectiveness. People will try just about anything short of napalm for relief and we would like to share a few alternatives you can use to protect your family.

Mosquito Curtains

Nothing is more effective than a physical barrier to separate you from mosquitoes. Mosquito curtains are a removable and washable alternative to permanent screening. Originally designed for upscale homes, they are elegant and attractive, yet are much more affordable than traditional screening.

Mosquito Curtains are offered in various colors such as White, Ivory, and Black as well as a “no-see-um” mesh for coastal sand flies. A typical 40ft. porch cost $720 and may be hung using a variety of attachment methods including curtain tracking similar to what is used for hospital privacy curtains.

Home-made Remedies


Our favorite home-made remedy is a very simple and inexpensive “plate trap.” Fill a white dinner plate with water and a few drops of lemon scented dishwashing soap. Set a few traps outside and count your dead. The mosquitoes are attracted to both the white color and lemon scent. As they land to lay their eggs they get stuck in the soapy emulsion and cannot escape. In an informal field test, five of these plate traps killed as many mosquitoes as an expensive one-acre propane trap for a fraction of a penny.

Propane Traps

Propane traps kill mosquitoes. However, at an initial price tag of $400 and $30 per month for propane and lure replacements, they can be costly and a hassle to operate. Often they attract mosquitoes from a broader area than you wish to control. And while your neighbors will appreciate your good deeds, mosquito populations may not be reduced as quickly as you might hope.

Mosquito Misting Systems

Mosquito misting systems are certainly the new rage among upscale homes that can afford the relatively high installation and maintenance cost. A word of caution though as some manufacturers have come under scrutiny for misleading advertising claiming that the chemicals are completely safe. While the headline insecticide may be harmless, it is sometimes supplemented with dangerous ingredients. One need only read the WARNING label to assess the dangers of this system.




Lasting Effects of the West Nile Virus

As we hear about West Nile Virus on the news, it is easy to become complacent. Since 2000, there have been over 40,000 reported cases more than 1,000 deaths. We read that the most susceptible are the elderly and young children, particularly those with weak immune systems. But, what is not fully appreciated is the lasting effects that this virus can have on those that are considered to be relatively healthy. 

About one-third of the recorded cases are considered “serious.” Such cases often involve days or even weeks of intensive care hospitalization. Symptoms include fever, headache, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash on the trunk of the body and swollen lymph glands. Infection may spread to the nervous system or bloodstream and cause sudden fever, intense headache, and stiff neck and confusion, possibly resulting in encephalitis or meningitis. 

The symptoms of severe infection ( West Nile encephalitis or meningitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and polio-like paralysis. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, more people will suffer polio-like paralysis from the disease than will die. 

The West Nile virus infection spreads by the bite of infected mosquitoes and usually causes a mild illness, but may also cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). This virus is named after the West Nile region of Uganda where the virus was first isolated in 1937. It was first identified in the United States in New York in 1999.

Anyone can get West Nile virus infection if bitten by an infected mosquito; however, even in areas where transmission is known to be occurring only a small proportion of mosquitoes are likely to be infected. People who are over age 50 are at greater risk of severe illness.

West Nile virus is almost always spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes are infected by biting a bird that carries the virus. West Nile virus is not spread from person to person, but some cases have resulted from blood transfusion and organ transplants. 

The Mosquito Curtain is very effective for protecting covered porch areas from mosquitoes. The netting material is made of a sturdy 100% polyester suitable for regular outdoor use. See: www.mosquitocurtains.com

While the netting acts as a physical barrier, the advantage of the curtain is that it is seasonally removable. Many in the north find permanent screen porches difficult to maintain during the winter months. Because the curtain is removable and washable, it can easily be removed and stored during the months when mosquitoes are not prevalent.
As we hear about West Nile Virus on the news, it is easy to become complacent. Since 2000, there have been over 40,000 reported cases more than 1,000 deaths. We read that the most susceptible are the elderly and young children, particularly those with weak immune systems. But, what is not fully appreciated is the lasting effects that this virus can have on those that are considered to be relatively healthy. 

About one-third of the recorded cases are considered “serious.” Such cases often involve days or even weeks of intensive care hospitalization. Symptoms include fever, headache, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash on the trunk of the body and swollen lymph glands. Infection may spread to the nervous system or bloodstream and cause sudden fever, intense headache, and stiff neck and confusion, possibly resulting in encephalitis or meningitis. 

The symptoms of severe infection ( West Nile encephalitis or meningitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and polio-like paralysis. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, more people will suffer polio-like paralysis from the disease than will die. 

The West Nile virus infection spreads by the bite of infected mosquitoes and usually causes a mild illness, but may also cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). This virus is named after the West Nile region of Uganda where the virus was first isolated in 1937. It was first identified in the United States in New York in 1999.

Anyone can get West Nile virus infection if bitten by an infected mosquito; however, even in areas where transmission is known to be occurring only a small proportion of mosquitoes are likely to be infected. People who are over age 50 are at greater risk of severe illness.

West Nile virus is almost always spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes are infected by biting a bird that carries the virus. West Nile virus is not spread from person to person, but some cases have resulted from blood transfusion and organ transplants. 

The Mosquito Curtain is very effective for protecting covered porch areas from mosquitoes. The netting material is made of a sturdy 100% polyester suitable for regular outdoor use. See: www.mosquitocurtains.com

While the netting acts as a physical barrier, the advantage of the curtain is that it is seasonally removable. Many in the north find permanent screen porches difficult to maintain during the winter months. Because the curtain is removable and washable, it can easily be removed and stored during the months when mosquitoes are not prevalent.



History of Man’s Deadliest Killer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: www.MosquitoCurtains.com

You can also watch this fun slide show. As the summer season approaches, people are already thinking about mosquitos.  There is nothing more aggravating than that high pitched whine in the middle of the night of a mosquito hunting you for another meal.  A mother’s visceral reaction to a nasty blood sucker on a child’s forehead will certainly incur her speedy wrath.  While today the risks to Americans is relatively low, this disease carrying monster has inflicted far more harm on mankind than most of us in the U.S. realize.  Here are a few historical facts about this deadly killer.

The number one killer of man is the mosquito. Mosquitos kill over one million people per year world-wide.  Of 207 million cases of Malaria in 2012, there have been 627,000 deaths from Malaria, alone.  In fact, mosquitos have killed more people than all the wars in all of history.  Other diseases include St Louis encephalitis, West Nile Virus, Dengue Fever and the deadly Yellow Fever.  Mosquitos containing the malarial parasite have been found in amber fossils as old as 30 million years. 

Malaria is the Latin Tem for “Bad Air” Julius Caesar believed malaria was caused by the stinky marshes surrounding Rome. Caesar is credited for significantly reducing the incidence of malaria in Rome by draining the marshy breeding grounds.  While it wouldn’t be until the late 19th century before Malaria was linked to mosquitos, the bad air theory would last for another 1,900 years.  Even British royalty would escape to the mountains during the summer to escape the “bad air” that William Shakespeare mentions in several of his plays as “marsh fever”.

Biblical hysteria was probably not demonic possession. Malaria that was common in biblical times.  Cerebral malaria can certainly cause hallucinations during episodes of fever that could have easily been interpreted as demonic possession.

Execution by Mosquito Ask anyone in Alaska and they will tell you that mosquitos are fiercely intense, albeit for a shorter season.  It was commonly reported that a cruel form of execution was to strip a man naked and send him down the Yukon in a canoe where he would either die of suffocation by inhaling the clouds of mosquitos or die of blood loss called desanguination.  Mosquitos hibernate in cold temperatures and have adapted to breed quickly in colder climates.  The mosquito seasons are shorter in colder regions but are far more intense.

Yellow Fever is the most lethal Mosquito vectored disease.  Yellow Fever originated in Africa and likely transmitted to America through the slave trade. With a staggering 50% mortality rate, this disease was practically a death sentence with no cure.  Even George Washington was forced to leave the capital of Philadelphia during the 1793 outbreak that decimated 10% of the population. Several other port cities faced similar deadly epidemics. The building of the Panama Canal hospitalized 80% of the workers due to both Malaria and Yellow Fever.  

Florida considered uninhabitable.   Up until about 1845, Florida was considered uninhabitable due to mosquito borne disease, but when Henry Flagler built the FL East Coast Railroad, the wealthy began building vacation homes.  The wealthy could afford marsh draining (like Caesar), fans and bed netting to protect themselves.  At the turn of the century in 1890, with the help of Walter Reed stationed in Cuba during the Spanish American War, scientists finally found the link between these diseases and the parasite carried by mosquitos.  From then on, attention turned to mosquito control and eradication and these diseases became far less prevalent. 

It wasn’t until 1950 that mosquito borne diseases were under full control in the U.S. Believe it or not, it is probably window screens and air conditioning that did the most to bring an end to these diseases.  Air conditioning enables people to close their windows during the summer months effectively sealing the house.  In addition, the improved education and preventative measures also made a marked difference.  Probably the best way to protect your home is to remove sources of standing water that can be found in anything as small as a bottle cap or leaf.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: www.MosquitoCurtains.com

You can also watch this fun slide show. As the summer season approaches, people are already thinking about mosquitos.  There is nothing more aggravating than that high pitched whine in the middle of the night of a mosquito hunting you for another meal.  A mother’s visceral reaction to a nasty blood sucker on a child’s forehead will certainly incur her speedy wrath.  While today the risks to Americans is relatively low, this disease carrying monster has inflicted far more harm on mankind than most of us in the U.S. realize.  Here are a few historical facts about this deadly killer.

The number one killer of man is the mosquito. Mosquitos kill over one million people per year world-wide.  Of 207 million cases of Malaria in 2012, there have been 627,000 deaths from Malaria, alone.  In fact, mosquitos have killed more people than all the wars in all of history.  Other diseases include St Louis encephalitis, West Nile Virus, Dengue Fever and the deadly Yellow Fever.  Mosquitos containing the malarial parasite have been found in amber fossils as old as 30 million years. 

Malaria is the Latin Tem for “Bad Air” Julius Caesar believed malaria was caused by the stinky marshes surrounding Rome. Caesar is credited for significantly reducing the incidence of malaria in Rome by draining the marshy breeding grounds.  While it wouldn’t be until the late 19th century before Malaria was linked to mosquitos, the bad air theory would last for another 1,900 years.  Even British royalty would escape to the mountains during the summer to escape the “bad air” that William Shakespeare mentions in several of his plays as “marsh fever”.

Biblical hysteria was probably not demonic possession. Malaria that was common in biblical times.  Cerebral malaria can certainly cause hallucinations during episodes of fever that could have easily been interpreted as demonic possession.

Execution by Mosquito Ask anyone in Alaska and they will tell you that mosquitos are fiercely intense, albeit for a shorter season.  It was commonly reported that a cruel form of execution was to strip a man naked and send him down the Yukon in a canoe where he would either die of suffocation by inhaling the clouds of mosquitos or die of blood loss called desanguination.  Mosquitos hibernate in cold temperatures and have adapted to breed quickly in colder climates.  The mosquito seasons are shorter in colder regions but are far more intense.

Yellow Fever is the most lethal Mosquito vectored disease.  Yellow Fever originated in Africa and likely transmitted to America through the slave trade. With a staggering 50% mortality rate, this disease was practically a death sentence with no cure.  Even George Washington was forced to leave the capital of Philadelphia during the 1793 outbreak that decimated 10% of the population. Several other port cities faced similar deadly epidemics. The building of the Panama Canal hospitalized 80% of the workers due to both Malaria and Yellow Fever.  

Florida considered uninhabitable.   Up until about 1845, Florida was considered uninhabitable due to mosquito borne disease, but when Henry Flagler built the FL East Coast Railroad, the wealthy began building vacation homes.  The wealthy could afford marsh draining (like Caesar), fans and bed netting to protect themselves.  At the turn of the century in 1890, with the help of Walter Reed stationed in Cuba during the Spanish American War, scientists finally found the link between these diseases and the parasite carried by mosquitos.  From then on, attention turned to mosquito control and eradication and these diseases became far less prevalent. 

It wasn’t until 1950 that mosquito borne diseases were under full control in the U.S. Believe it or not, it is probably window screens and air conditioning that did the most to bring an end to these diseases.  Air conditioning enables people to close their windows during the summer months effectively sealing the house.  In addition, the improved education and preventative measures also made a marked difference.  Probably the best way to protect your home is to remove sources of standing water that can be found in anything as small as a bottle cap or leaf.



Teaching Children That “Work is Good"


Isabella (9yrs) cutting panels




Patrick (11yrs) works as stockroom boy
Every parent would like to raise their children to be happy productive adults.  Considering that work comprises more than half of the adult waking day, wouldn't it be nice if we could guide our children to find fulfillment in their adult careers?

So many adults do not find fulfillment in their jobs. Many view work as what you do until enough nickels are saved after kids, mortgage, and tuition to last you through that window between retirement and the hereafter.  We find ourselves trapped in our jobs that we perform out of obligation rather than any form of self-actualization.

This is what children see when parents come home each night with slumped shoulders; the workday etched on their faces.  Believe it or not, they know why you are in that absent fog.  After all, those little video cameras are constantly recording and children are constantly imprinting the message that work stinks! 

Unfortunately, jobs previously reserved for children delivering papers and mowing lawns are, for the most part, gone.  Without these jobs, children don’t have the opportunity to learn their own lessons by working independently outside the home and away from household chores.

We can tell children that “work is good” and explain how they contribute to society and are rewarded; but, what they see on our faces something very different and has a much stronger impression on them.  It would have a far greater impact on our children to show them that work is good by seeking fulfilling careers ourselves.

Kurt Jordan was a bond salesman for various Wall Street firms for over 19 years.  While many aspects of the business were interesting to him, after the first 10 years, he was burnt out and lost his desire to fight for his seat in a consolidating industry.  He felt like a round peg in a square hole continually fighting for his right to milk the golden cow.  He could only stare at a stack of trade tickets and try to rationalize how he contributed to society by facilitating market liquidity.

As Kurt puts it, “I knew it.  My wife knew it.  And, my children knew it.  But how do you chase that blue collar spirit when you have those white collar bills?  How could I recklessly toss my tie to the wind for some other career?  Nope, too irresponsible and not enough courage!”

“For years, my wife and I had an idea for Mosquito Curtains, an elegant and cost effective alternative to permanent screening that we had been sitting on for years.  Eventually, I decided to go for it rather than wait for that fateful tap on the shoulder telling me to step aside for younger meat.” 

Fortunately, the family business took off and proved viable in a short amount of time.  As a summer business, Kurt was able to give his young children jobs taping boxes, printing shipping labels, and packaging kits.  The kids could hear the phone orders, participate in the production, and load boxes in the FedEx truck.



Isabella (9yrs) cutting panels




Patrick (11yrs) works as stockroom boy
Every parent would like to raise their children to be happy productive adults.  Considering that work comprises more than half of the adult waking day, wouldn't it be nice if we could guide our children to find fulfillment in their adult careers?

So many adults do not find fulfillment in their jobs. Many view work as what you do until enough nickels are saved after kids, mortgage, and tuition to last you through that window between retirement and the hereafter.  We find ourselves trapped in our jobs that we perform out of obligation rather than any form of self-actualization.

This is what children see when parents come home each night with slumped shoulders; the workday etched on their faces.  Believe it or not, they know why you are in that absent fog.  After all, those little video cameras are constantly recording and children are constantly imprinting the message that work stinks! 

Unfortunately, jobs previously reserved for children delivering papers and mowing lawns are, for the most part, gone.  Without these jobs, children don’t have the opportunity to learn their own lessons by working independently outside the home and away from household chores.

We can tell children that “work is good” and explain how they contribute to society and are rewarded; but, what they see on our faces something very different and has a much stronger impression on them.  It would have a far greater impact on our children to show them that work is good by seeking fulfilling careers ourselves.

Kurt Jordan was a bond salesman for various Wall Street firms for over 19 years.  While many aspects of the business were interesting to him, after the first 10 years, he was burnt out and lost his desire to fight for his seat in a consolidating industry.  He felt like a round peg in a square hole continually fighting for his right to milk the golden cow.  He could only stare at a stack of trade tickets and try to rationalize how he contributed to society by facilitating market liquidity.

As Kurt puts it, “I knew it.  My wife knew it.  And, my children knew it.  But how do you chase that blue collar spirit when you have those white collar bills?  How could I recklessly toss my tie to the wind for some other career?  Nope, too irresponsible and not enough courage!”

“For years, my wife and I had an idea for Mosquito Curtains, an elegant and cost effective alternative to permanent screening that we had been sitting on for years.  Eventually, I decided to go for it rather than wait for that fateful tap on the shoulder telling me to step aside for younger meat.” 

Fortunately, the family business took off and proved viable in a short amount of time.  As a summer business, Kurt was able to give his young children jobs taping boxes, printing shipping labels, and packaging kits.  The kids could hear the phone orders, participate in the production, and load boxes in the FedEx truck.





Dear Martha Stewart...

March 20, 2007

Dear Martha,

I would love to share how our “Martha Stewart” approach to solving a common problem has resulted in the inspiration of a simple invention and a budding e-commerce family business. 

First, God bless Martha Stewart! You have contributed so much to home, family and living life more beautifully!  You are an idol and icon for women that value all those very things you promote.  You have gained us respect and appreciation, and even proved we weren’t insane for seeking perfection. This I know from personal experience, the first time I heard the name, Martha Stewart, one December.

I’ll never forget my mother bursting into the house with a magazine lampooning Martha Stewart hot gluing branches on the Christmas tree.  You see, for years my mother had been making my father drill holes in the trunk and wire extra branches to the trees to make them perfect.  Fully aware of the satire on Martha, she made us understand that perfection was worth striving for.  We five kids laughed hysterically while my mother stood there with a knowing smirk. 

It was growing up with this constant ingenuity that inspired my husband and me to solve a problem in a simple way.  Our home in Atlanta resembles some of the old Victorian farmhouses dotting the outer shores of Long Island with a broad porch, gingerbread trim, and cedar shingles.  It’s our porch with beckoning breezes and filtered sun that we love most.  The porch is our family sanctuary where we gather to sing to dad’s guitar, play games, tell tales, reading, and young masterpiece paintings.  Almost all gatherings with family and friends are lured to the porch.  However, Atlanta’s warm mosquito season and the advent of West Nile virus drove us to invent.

We had failed with mosquito magnets, citronella candles, bug zappers, and chemical sprays and my husband urged me to resign myself to expensive and ugly permanent screening as our only recourse.  But, the idea of paying thousands of dollars for a permanent eye sore was not appealing!  Inspired by pioneers like you and my own never give up mother, I was convinced we could create a solution.  After years of watching you show us simple, inexpensive, clever, and always attractive solutions to make the house a most inviting home, we came up with “Mosquito Curtains”.

These elegant netting curtains are custom made to fit a multitude of outdoor needs.  They are simple, removable, washable and easy to self-install.  Now we have a porch that is even more attractive and it is now protected from preying pests.  The Mosquito Curtains come in White, Ivory, and Black and can be gathered in graceful swags at the porch pillars or removed entirely with almost no effort.  It has been five years since we made our first curtains.  Their durability has been proven as they have withstood stormy weather, rambunctious pets and swarms of children.  In 2006, we proudly advertised in Martha Stewart Living.

We would love to send you some Mosquito Curtains for your enjoyment at one of your lovely homes as a sign of our appreciation for what you have shared with us and so many others over the years, but also to share what we believe to be a “Good Thing”.    I have also promised my daughter and husband that I would mention to you that they both have special recipes that they would love to share with you.  My 8yr old daughter, Isabella, makes her own version of pancakes we call “Bella Cakes”, with a few secret ingredients that she will be happy to share.  My husband, Kurt, makes a ceviche that impresses my Peruvian relatives. 

Requests are now coming from around the globe and we continue to test new ideas.  Our customers are reporting back with delighted thanks and glowing praise of our unique fabric and attention to detail.  Please visit the photo gallery on our website to see the fruits of your inspiration and our determination www.mosquitocurtains.com

Looking forward to a meeting in the future and all my best,

Elizabeth Jordan

March 20, 2007

Dear Martha,

I would love to share how our “Martha Stewart” approach to solving a common problem has resulted in the inspiration of a simple invention and a budding e-commerce family business. 

First, God bless Martha Stewart! You have contributed so much to home, family and living life more beautifully!  You are an idol and icon for women that value all those very things you promote.  You have gained us respect and appreciation, and even proved we weren’t insane for seeking perfection. This I know from personal experience, the first time I heard the name, Martha Stewart, one December.

I’ll never forget my mother bursting into the house with a magazine lampooning Martha Stewart hot gluing branches on the Christmas tree.  You see, for years my mother had been making my father drill holes in the trunk and wire extra branches to the trees to make them perfect.  Fully aware of the satire on Martha, she made us understand that perfection was worth striving for.  We five kids laughed hysterically while my mother stood there with a knowing smirk. 

It was growing up with this constant ingenuity that inspired my husband and me to solve a problem in a simple way.  Our home in Atlanta resembles some of the old Victorian farmhouses dotting the outer shores of Long Island with a broad porch, gingerbread trim, and cedar shingles.  It’s our porch with beckoning breezes and filtered sun that we love most.  The porch is our family sanctuary where we gather to sing to dad’s guitar, play games, tell tales, reading, and young masterpiece paintings.  Almost all gatherings with family and friends are lured to the porch.  However, Atlanta’s warm mosquito season and the advent of West Nile virus drove us to invent.

We had failed with mosquito magnets, citronella candles, bug zappers, and chemical sprays and my husband urged me to resign myself to expensive and ugly permanent screening as our only recourse.  But, the idea of paying thousands of dollars for a permanent eye sore was not appealing!  Inspired by pioneers like you and my own never give up mother, I was convinced we could create a solution.  After years of watching you show us simple, inexpensive, clever, and always attractive solutions to make the house a most inviting home, we came up with “Mosquito Curtains”.

These elegant netting curtains are custom made to fit a multitude of outdoor needs.  They are simple, removable, washable and easy to self-install.  Now we have a porch that is even more attractive and it is now protected from preying pests.  The Mosquito Curtains come in White, Ivory, and Black and can be gathered in graceful swags at the porch pillars or removed entirely with almost no effort.  It has been five years since we made our first curtains.  Their durability has been proven as they have withstood stormy weather, rambunctious pets and swarms of children.  In 2006, we proudly advertised in Martha Stewart Living.

We would love to send you some Mosquito Curtains for your enjoyment at one of your lovely homes as a sign of our appreciation for what you have shared with us and so many others over the years, but also to share what we believe to be a “Good Thing”.    I have also promised my daughter and husband that I would mention to you that they both have special recipes that they would love to share with you.  My 8yr old daughter, Isabella, makes her own version of pancakes we call “Bella Cakes”, with a few secret ingredients that she will be happy to share.  My husband, Kurt, makes a ceviche that impresses my Peruvian relatives. 

Requests are now coming from around the globe and we continue to test new ideas.  Our customers are reporting back with delighted thanks and glowing praise of our unique fabric and attention to detail.  Please visit the photo gallery on our website to see the fruits of your inspiration and our determination www.mosquitocurtains.com

Looking forward to a meeting in the future and all my best,

Elizabeth Jordan




A Very Cool Project For Kids (They'll Remember It Forever)


A Sail Cart on Roller Skates



Sail-cart1Sail-cart1
View general plan or detailed plan.


If you grew up during the Great Depression, chances are you learned to make your own fun. Yet another wonderful quality of the Greatest Generation is that they learned to make just about anything out of scraps of whatever was available. The talent partially passed to the next generation, but has certainly faded now that our kids are consumed by video games and Sponge Bob.

We are a generation of convenience where if we want it, we buy it. The reality hit me when my son, confounded by the logistics of Christmas Eve, asked if Santa really made toys or just picked them up at Wal-Mart like everyone else. It was time to resurrect a little of that old fashioned magic, so I called my favorite elf, Dad.

When I was a child, my father made us a soap box car with a broom handle steering wheel wrapped with a rope that fed through pulleys turning the front wheels. We once hammered a two-by-four mast and stole one of mom's sheets off the clothes line. It worked...until we had to explain to mom that we nailed holes in her torn sheet. As owner of MosquitoCurtains.com, I sew large panels of material in a sturdy binding that can attach to virtually anything. Why not use sheets of Tyvek between two layers of netting to make my sail?

The roller skate wheels are easy to come by and all the other materials are available at Lowe's. I hope you get those creative juices flowing and make something cool for your son or daughter. It will likely be a loving memory they'll remember forever.

Duke JordanSail cart
         Duke Jordan




A Sail Cart on Roller Skates



Sail-cart1Sail-cart1
View general plan or detailed plan.


If you grew up during the Great Depression, chances are you learned to make your own fun. Yet another wonderful quality of the Greatest Generation is that they learned to make just about anything out of scraps of whatever was available. The talent partially passed to the next generation, but has certainly faded now that our kids are consumed by video games and Sponge Bob.

We are a generation of convenience where if we want it, we buy it. The reality hit me when my son, confounded by the logistics of Christmas Eve, asked if Santa really made toys or just picked them up at Wal-Mart like everyone else. It was time to resurrect a little of that old fashioned magic, so I called my favorite elf, Dad.

When I was a child, my father made us a soap box car with a broom handle steering wheel wrapped with a rope that fed through pulleys turning the front wheels. We once hammered a two-by-four mast and stole one of mom's sheets off the clothes line. It worked...until we had to explain to mom that we nailed holes in her torn sheet. As owner of MosquitoCurtains.com, I sew large panels of material in a sturdy binding that can attach to virtually anything. Why not use sheets of Tyvek between two layers of netting to make my sail?

The roller skate wheels are easy to come by and all the other materials are available at Lowe's. I hope you get those creative juices flowing and make something cool for your son or daughter. It will likely be a loving memory they'll remember forever.

Duke JordanSail cart
         Duke Jordan






Avoid the Spring Rush when we are up to our eye-balls in seasonal orders.
Help us even out our production with this 10% discount that ends Feb 28th.
Coupon code = 2018-earlybird

(For your convenience we'll add the coupon code for you in your shopping cart)

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