6. Sealing the Base

Securing the Bottom

There is something a bit counterintuitive about securing the base of your curtain. At first, you might think the best way to secure the bottom is to pull it straight down and perhaps tie it down or weight it, however the key to securing the base is horizontal tension. Weights do not work for outdoor curtains because they aren't heavy enough and weights drive the base of the curtain into the floor wearing it faster. Instead, use Marine Snaps to secure the base and Elastic Cord described below.

screen room fastenersinsect curtain snapImagine for a moment, we laid a 20ft belt from the Jolly Green Giant on the side walk. If you step on one end, and Martha Stewart stands on the other end, it would be hard to lift the middle of the belt. The little bit of horizontal tension would be enough to keep the belt down. Marine snaps every 6 - 12ft help to maintain horizontal tension along the base especially in the corners. Generally, this is the spacing of support columns where marine snaps can be placed into the base of the column.

Elastic Cord For An Inside Hang (commonly used for tracking attachment)

Notice that the elastic cord acts as a false column giving the curtain "something to go around". This vertical elastic cord greatly helps to keep the base of the curtain down. securing insect curtain Elastic cord clips to a D-ring Between ceiling and floor just inside the curtain to create a vertical rib inside the curtain. stablize insect curtains Curtains with tracking attachment typically take a path on the inside of your columns often with configurations where panels straddle a corner. You will still need a little more support in the corners using elastic cord. Elastic cord can be thought of as a large bungee cord clipped vertically between 2 D-rings. Elastic cord is not attached to the curtain at all. It acts as a false column giving the curtain a corner rib to brace the curtain in the breeze and help to maintain horizontal tension. These vertical elastic cord ribs can actually be placed anywhere to add support to the curtain in breezy conditions. The best location is in front of columns to act as a giant rubber band to "pinch" the curtain to the column.

When panels do not straddle a corner (2 adjacent panels attach independently to a corner column), then elastic cord is unnecessary since the column itself will act as corner support. Keep in mind that we are really only trying to secure the curtains under breezy conditions. Mosquitoes are terrible fliers and cannot fly at wind speeds above 15.7 mph. In heavy winds, draw your curtains open and enjoy the fresh air.

An Outside Hang (commonly used for fixed Velcro® attachment)

Because curtains cannot be drawn open, it is important to secure your curtains well. For a fixed top attachment, it is best to use and outside hang taking a path around your support columns to provide more structure under windy conditions.

New Tether Clips

fastening insect curtainsThere are times when you may not want to snap the base of your curtains. Perhaps you have a tile floor or the base of your column is plastic and won't hold a screw. Hmm...what to do? We have a clip that will fasten to the bottom webbing (NEVER to netting). Click on image to right to enlarge and see how it is rigged. (We actually use Black cord for black curtains).

Outdoor Insect Curtains are Designed for a Relaxed Fit.

They aren't stretched taut like a drum nor are they sloppy loose. The relaxed fit will animate your curtain allowing it to wave a bit in the breeze, but will maintain just enough horizontal tension to keep the base down. In the PLAN section we will discuss some measurement adjustments. Don't be concerned about tiny gaps around the edges. A mosquito is D-U-M-B. It smells certain chemicals and vectors right towards you. Nonetheless, we want the best seal possible.